Unnamed Congressmen

The Harriss house has a “side portico which, merely a side one, would have held a president and cabinet or a supreme court all right though a little cozy for Congress” (249).

Unnamed Judges

The Harriss house has a “side portico which, merely a side one, would have held a president and cabinet or a supreme court all right though a little cozy for Congress” (249).

Unnamed Judges

The Harriss house has a “side portico which, merely a side one, would have held a president and cabinet or a supreme court all right though a little cozy for Congress” (249).

Unnamed Cabinet Ministers

The Harriss house has a “side portico which, merely a side one, would have held a president and cabinet or a supreme court all right though a little cozy for Congress” (249).

Unnamed U.S. President

The Harriss house has a “side portico which, merely a side one, would have held a president and cabinet or a supreme court all right though a little cozy for Congress” (249).

Unnamed Policemen

Gavin Stevens, who does not want to involve the police, tells Robert Markey on the telephone: “no, not the police” (201).

Robert Markey

Robert Markey is “a lawyer and in city politics too, who had been at Heidelberg with his uncle” (201).

Unnamed Doctor

Gavin Stevens on the telephone in answering Miss Harriss’s call about Max Harriss’s departure for Memphis: “never prescribe for a physician” (201).

Paoli

According to his sister, Max Harris “had been the best pupil Paoli had had in years” (190).

Unnamed American Serviceman

Charles Mallison recalls December 7th, 1941, when “a Jap dropped a bomb on another American” (254).

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