Mississippi State Insane Asylum (Jackson) in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

The Mississippi State Insane Asylum - which Ratliff refers to as "the Jackson a-sylum" (73) - was located in the state capital, Jackson, until 1935.

River Road in Bear Hunt in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

When Provine leaves camp to go to the mound, he travels down "the road that went down the bottom" (72). Given the fact that the woods in the story are called a "jungle of cane and gum and pin oak" (65), this "road" is probably more like a path.

Hunting Stand 1 in "Bear Hunt" in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

A deer-hunting "stand" can be a structure, a platform attached to a tree that allows the hunter to wait a dozen or so feet above the ground for his prey to walk past - or "stand" can simply mean a specific place on the ground, usually against a tree, where the hunter waits. In either case, when a group is hunting, "stands" are a way to make sure that everyone in the party knows where the other hunters are. In this story, the "deer standers" are spaced in at least three places along the railroad track that runs through the woods; this first stand is occupied by Ike McCaslin (69).

Hunting Stand 3 in "Bear Hunt" in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

A deer-hunting "stand" can be a structure, a platform attached to a tree that allows the hunter to wait a dozen or so feet above the ground for his prey to walk past - or "stand" can simply mean a specific place on the ground, usually against a tree, where the hunter waits. In either case, when a group is hunting, "stands" are a way to make sure that everyone in the party knows where the other hunters are.

Hunting Stand 2 in "Bear Hunt" in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

A deer-hunting "stand" can be a structure, a platform attached to a tree that allows the hunter to wait a dozen or so feet above the ground for his prey to walk past - or "stand" can simply mean a specific place on the ground, usually against a tree, where the hunter waits. In either case, when a group is hunting, "stands" are a way to make sure that everyone in the party knows where the other hunters are.

Logging Company Railroad in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

In Faulkner's hunting stories, a "log-line" is a temporary spur railroad that has been built by a lumber company to carry the trees they cut down out of the woods. Therefore the story's "log-line levee" is probably an earthen dyke that has been built to keep the tracks from being flooded when the river rises, though it could instead be the raised and flattened bed on which the tracks run (69).

Chickasaw Settlement and Store in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

The story's Chickasaw Indians live near the mound, in "their own settlement," a community that includes their own "store" as well (65). According to the frame narrator, they live "under Government protection," which suggests something like a reservation. Yoknapatawpha is located in the area that was once occupied by the Chickasaw, though they lived there later than the aboriginal people who constructed the mounds.

Indian Mound 1 in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

"Five miles . . . down the river from Major de Spain's camp," in a "wilder part of the river's jungle," is the topographical feature Ratliff calls "an Indian mound" - "the only elevation of any kind" in the "flat jungle of river bottom" (65). Many real earthen mounds, built at different times over almost two thousand years by the aboriginal peoples who once occupied Mississippi, still exist.

Negro Church in County 3 in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

The African-American church that is the scene of the picnic where Ash first tangled with Provine is "a few miles from town" (64) - though the text doesn't tell us in which direction.

Hunting Camp Kitchen in "A Bear Hunt" (Location)

In this story, Major de Spain's hunting camp includes a "kitchen" that, in the fashion of many of the larger residences in Yoknapatawpha, is in a separate building (71): when Ratliff tries to summon Ash, the black servant who is in charge of the kitchen, he goes "to the door" of the camp itself, and yells "towards the kitchen" (74). Like other such kitchens, this one is a racially defined space, the place where the story's black characters can usually be found when they are not serving the white men in the hunting party.

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