Character Keys

Displaying 3201 - 3300 of 3747

Add a new Character Key

Code title biography
425 Mitchell

In "Hand upon Waters" Ike tells Stevens that Lonnie Grinnup had saved his "burying money" with Mitchell "at the store" (73). It's clear that the money is for his funeral expenses, but not clear who "Mitchell" is in this context. He could be the store owner (though in all the other fictions where the Frenchman's Bend store occurs, it is owned by the Varners), or - as seems more likely - Mitchell is a local undertaker, whose clients put money away for him at the store, which thus functions as a kind of bank for the people who live outside the town.

423 Minnie

The Negro maid who works in Miss Reba's Memphis brothel appears in four novels. In Sanctuary, where she is named Minnie, she is a kind of confidant and guardian to Temple - either because Popeye pays her, or because she is afraid of him. This role is made explicit in her next appearance, in Requiem for a Nun, where she is not named: Temple describes her as both her guard and the one person with whom she could "talk" (111-12).

865 Unnamed Men at Varner's Store 5

Varner's store is a gathering place for the people who live in Frenchman's Bend. In The Town there are two references to the groups of men, specifically, who are found there. Gavin's hypothetical account of Mrs. Varner's visit to the store refers to the "few loungers" whom she chases out - these men "should have been in the field," since it's "planting time" (307). Later "the men squatting along the gallery" (388) - whom Ratliff also describes as a "few neighbors" (384) - rush off to rescue Clarence Snopes from Byron's children (388).

597 Unnamed Men at Varner's Store 3

In Light in August the group of men at Varner's store who watch as the pregnant Lena Grove descends from Armstid's wagon are described as "squatting" and "already spitting across the heelgnawed porch" (25). They "listen quietly" as the tells her story, and are all sure she will never again see the father of the child she carries (26).

864 Unnamed Men at Varner's Store 2

At almost any time of day, apparently, the porch in front of Varner's store serves as the gathering place for groups of men from nearby farms in "Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard." While sitting on the porch they discuss local events and characters.

422 Unnamed Men at Varner's Store 4

In "Fool about a Horse" the "other men" who have gathered at Varner's store are more small farmers from the Frenchman's Bend area (122).

863 Unnamed Memphis Police 4

In The Mansion Miss Reba and her pimp have to "pay off" the "cops" in order to stay in business (80, 81).

862 Unnamed Memphis Police 1

According to the story Quentin Compson heard and recalls in The Sound and the Fury, it takes three Memphis policemen to subdue the naked Negroes who disturb the peace in the throes of a religious trance.

861 Unnamed Memphis Police 2

In Light in August the police in Memphis arrest the drunken man in Mrs. Hightower's hotel room after her death and also find the pieces of paper on which she wrote and tore up her "rightful name" (67).

421 Unnamed Memphis Police 3

In the short story "Gold Is Not Always," and also in the revised version of the story in Go Down, Moses, Roth Edmonds expects to find evidence that his missing mule has been loaded into a truck and taken to Memphis, an so intends to report her as stolen to the Jefferson sheriff and the Memphis police.

420 McAndrews

In "Pantaloon in Black" and again in Go Down, Moses, McAndrews is the first identified white character to appear. He is "the white foreman" at the sawmill where Rider works (244). Only in the deputy sheriff’s retelling of events is McAndrews referred to by name.

419 Matt Bowden

Matt Bowden is described in both "Vendee" and The Unvanquished in the same words. A criminal accomplice of Grumby whose name is not mentioned until after he himself has departed for Texas, Bowden is described with unusual detail. His clothes - "neat little fine made boots," "linen shirt," and "coat that had been good once, too" (103, 166) - and even his "small" hands and feet (104, 168) suggest an upper class background. When he first appears he is posing as a planter from Tennessee chasing Grumby himself.

418 Mason's Ruffians

Led by Samuel Ross Mason, a militia captain during the Revolutionary War, "Mason's ruffians" were a gang of river pirates and highwaymen who operated in the Mississippi Valley frontier in the late 18th century. Both the first-person narrator of "A Name for the City" and the omniscient third-person narrator of Requiem for a Nun reject the idea that the unnamed bandits who were briefly held in the settlement jail were part of this gang, because - as Requiem puts it - "even the last of Mason's ruffians were dead or scattered by this time" (5).

860 De Spain's Daughters

In "A Bear Hunt," the married but unnamed and unenumerated daughters of Manfred de Spain occur to the unnamed narrator when he speculates they might have been given a sewing machine by Mrs. de Spain. Manfred is usually depicted as a bachelor, but a son of his is mentioned in "Shall Not Perish."

439 Mrs. de Spain

The wife of Major de Spain is mentioned in "A Bear Hunt," when Ratliff wonders if she already owns a sewing machine - or may have given it to "one of her married daughters" (63). These daughters are never mentioned again, but Mrs. de Spain herself appears briefly but vividly in "Barn Burning" when Ab Snopes tracks manure onto the expensive "blond rug" inside the front door of her mansion (12).

859 De Spain, Son of Manfred de Spain

In "Shall Not Perish," the son of Major de Spain is an aviator and officer who is killed fighting in the Pacific, the second World War II casualty from Yoknapatawpha County.

417 Mary

The biblical mother of Jesus is mentioned in two fictions. In The Sound and the Fury Rev. Shegog mentions Mary in his Easter sermon, emphasizing her sufferings as a mother, "de pangs" of childbirth, her "weeping en lamentation" as she fears for the life of her newborn child and her grief at the scene of the crucifixion (296).

416 Martha Habersham

The Habersham family figures in Faulkner's fiction as one of the founders of Yoknapatawpha. Martha Habersham figures in "Skirmish at Sartoris" and again in The Unvanquished as the most determined among the Jefferson ladies who pressure Drusilla to behave like a woman. Convinced that Drusilla and John Sartoris' relationship is sexual, Mrs. Habersham takes the lead in planning the wedding between them. Her relationship to the other Habershams in the fictions is not explained.

415 Mannie

In "Pantaloon in Black" and again in Go Down, Moses, Mannie has been married to Rider for half a year when her sudden death (of unspecified causes) becomes the traumatic loss, the powerful absence, that generates the story. She is described as having a "narrow back" and "narrow" hand (241, 133). Rider indicates that she is far slighter than her powerfully built husband, but her spirit is strong: "You’s de onliest least thing whut ever kep up wid me one day, leff alone for weeks" (241, 133).

414 Major de Spain

Two characters referred to as "Major de Spain" appear in fifteen different fictions. Only one was a real Confederate "Major" during the Civil War; the other is his son, Manfred, who fought in the Spanish-American War as a Lieutenant but is called "Major" as a courtesy, and as a sign of the family's high status in Yoknapatawpha. They never appear together, but in four texts - "Shall Not Perish," The Town, The Mansion and The Reivers - both are referred to, and in those cases, it is easy to tell which "De Spain" Faulkner has in mind.

413 Manfred de Spain

Two characters referred to as "Major de Spain" appear in fifteen different fictions. Only one was a real Confederate "Major" during the Civil War; the other is his son, Manfred, who fought in the Spanish-American War as a Lieutenant but is called "Major" as a courtesy, and as a sign of the family's high status in Yoknapatawpha. They never appear together, but in four texts - "Shall Not Perish," The Town, The Mansion and The Reivers - both are referred to, and in those cases, it is easy to tell which "De Spain" Faulkner has in mind.

858 Ludus 2|Unnamed Husbands of Minnie

Minnie's former husband in Sanctuary - the first text in which she appears - is described as a "cook in a restaurant" who "didn't approve of Minnie's business" as a maid in a brothel, so he took everything he could from her and "went off with a waitress in the restaurant" (209-10). Minnie sounds glad to be rid of him. The husband referred to in The Mansion is named Ludus - and while he too steals Minnie's money, he also beats her savagely (89); although he's currently in prison, it's not clear that Minnie is rid of him.

1334 Ludus 1

In The Reivers, Ludus works as a driver for the livery stable, but is well known for his "tomcatting" - having affairs with local black women, single and married (13). When he "borry"s a team and wagon from the stable overnight to visit "a new girl" six miles out of town, he gets into trouble with Boon (10).

857 Miss Corrie

A major character in The Reivers. "Miss Corrie," as she is called when Lucius first meets her (99) - or "Everbe," as he calls her after learning later in the narrative that her given names are "Everbe Corinthia" (153) - was born in Kiblett, Arkansas. After her mother's death, her foster-mother put her to work as a prostitute "as soon as she was big enough" (154). She is, Lucius notes when he first meets her at Miss Reba's, "a big girl," "still a girl, young too, with dark hair and blue eyes and at first I thought her face was plain" (99).

856 Everbe Corrinthia I

In The Reivers Otis tells Lucius that Corrie (whose full first names are "Everbe Corinthia") is named for his "Grandmaw" (153). Since he is identified as Corrie's nephew, it seems likely that this woman is also her mother, or as Otis calls her, her "maw"; she died when Corrie herself was a young girl (153).

411 Lucius Hogganbeck

First introduced into the canon as Lucius (Luke) Provine in the short story "A Bear Hunt" (1934), where he is a major character, he recurs in the last two novels in the Snopes trilogy and The Reivers as Lucius Hogganbeck. As Provine, he is forty years old and almost toothless, a hanger-on at the hunting camp, a "tall, apparently strong and healthy man . . . who makes no effort whatever to support his wife and three children" (64), as well as violent, shiftless and boozy.

410 Louis Grenier

Louis Grenier occupies a special place in the history of Yoknapatawpha as the "Old Frenchman" after whom Frenchman's Bend is named. He himself never directly appears in any of the nine texts that mention him, though he gets closest to the narrative in "A Name for the City" and Requiem for a Nun, which describe the county during the antebellum years Grenier was there. In half of the fictions he is referred to only as "the Old Frenchman," and it's likely that none of the inhabitants of the Bend would recognize his name if they heard it.

409 Lonnie Grinnup

Lonnie Grinnup was christened Louis Grenier. He is, as Intruder in the Dust notes, the only living descendant of the elegante Frenchman, the first Louis Grenier, whose vast antebellum plantation gave Frenchman's Bend its name. Lonnie has no conception of his aristocratic heritage; he is "a cheerful middleaged man with the mind and face of a child" who lives in a decrepit shack twenty miles away from the mansion his ancestor built (74). In the earlier "Hand upon the Waters," his murder is the occasion for one of Faulkner's detective fictions.

408 General Longstreet

While James Longstreet is not nearly as mythic a Confederate figure as Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson or J.E.B. Stuart (only one character in the fictions, for example, is named after him, and even then the character's full name is "Jackson and Longstreet Fentry"), as a general and corps commander in Lee's Army of Northern Virginia Longstreet probably understood and practiced the more modern warfare that emerged on the battlefields better than any other Confederate commander.

403 Ketcham

In both "Pantaloon in Black" and Go Down, Moses Ketcham is an officer of the law who, despite his Dickensian name, works at the jail and deals with the men who have already been caught. He is at the jail trying to maintain order among the inmates when Rider is brought there. He is not named in Requiem for a Nun when Temple Drake Stevens describes his attempt to subdue the (also) unnamed Negro widower whose grief sends him into a frenzy.

855 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 6

In The Hamlet this is the justice of the peace in Jefferson who marries Flem Snopes and Eula Varner. (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

583 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 7

When Mink and his wife get married in the area of the convict camp in The Hamlet, the local Justice of the Peace "removed his chew of tobacco" before performing the ceremony (264). (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

854 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 4

The first Justice who appears in "Barn Burning" is a "shabby, collarless, graying man in spectacles"; he presides over the Ab Snopes' trial in makeshift court in a general store (4). Described as having a "kindly" face, he discourages Harris from making young Sarty Snopes undergo questioning (4). While the Justice does not have enough evidence to convict Ab of burning Harris' barn, he tells him: "I can't find against you, Snopes, but I can give you advice. Leave this country and don't come back to it" (5).

853 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 5

The second "Justice of the Peace" who appears in "Barn Burning" also holds court in a general store (17). He too is a "man in spectacles" (17). In the civil case he presides over, brought by Ab Snopes against Major de Spain, he decides how much Ab must pay for ruining Mrs. de Spain's rug. (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

852 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 9

In Intruder in the Dust Chick assumes he and his Uncle Gavin will have to "find a J.P.," a Justice of the Peace, to get legal permission to exhume Vinson Gowrie's body (72). (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

582 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 3

When Monk is arraigned, he tries to "make a speech" before this "J.P." - Justice of the Peace (42). (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

851 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 1

In "Miss Zilphia Gant" this local officer officiates at the marriage between Zilphia and her husband. (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

850 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 2

In Absalom, Absalom! Thomas Sutpen is arraigned before a justice of the peace. (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

402 Unnamed Justice of the Peace 10

In both the short story "By the People" and the novel The Mansion this is the unnamed Justice of the Peace in Frenchman's Bend whom Will Varner orders to make Clarence Snopes a constable. (The office of justice of the peace derives from traditional British legal practice, where justices belonged to the landed gentry. In Mississippi the office is an elected one.

401 Judge Long

In The Town Judge Long is the local judge who doesn't preside over Montgomery Ward Snopes' trial; in The Mansion, on the other hand, Judge Long is the presiding judge at Montgomery Ward Snopes' trial. Apparently between writing the two books Faulkner forgot the trouble that Flem Snopes went to in the first one to make sure his relative never appeared in Long's courtroom. In this second novel, Montgomery Ward refers to him as "that old sanctimonious lantern-jawed son of a bitch up there on that Federal bench" (77).

400 Judge Gowan

Judge Gowan is the judge in "A Point of Law" and again in Go Down, Moses who quickly and informally finds a common-sense way to dispose of the case against Lucas and George. Although he only appears in this one episode, Faulkner gives him a long history in Yoknapatawpha when, in the short story, Lucas recognizes him as the gentleman who, "thirty and forty years ago," used to stay with "Old Zach Edmonds" on the plantation during quail hunting season (222). The novel lengthens this pedigree: there Lucas remembers him from "old Cass' time forty and fifty years ago" (71).

399 Judge Dukinfield

In "Smoke," the story where he makes his first appearance, Judge Dukinfield is "a widower of sixty and more, portly, white-headed, with an erect and dignified carriage which the Negroes called 'rear-backted'" (12). The judge has a daughter named Emma. During his seventeen years as a Chancellor, his official judgments have been guided by the belief "that justice is fifty per cent legal knowledge and fifty per cent unhaste and confidence in himself and in God" (12).

849 John Brown

The radical abolitionist John Brown fought against slavery in the West before carrying out the raid on Harper's Ferry in 1859 that was intended to inspire a slave rebellion in the South. He is not mentioned in Light in August, but Joanna Burden's grandfather is clearly one of his partisans during the pro- and anti-slavery fighting that made Kansas 'Bleeding' or 'Bloody Kansas' in the early 1850s.

848 Joe 2

There are five characters in the fictions identified only as "Joe." This one lives in Memphis, where he is the proprietor of the Grotto club in Sanctuary (247); he is bald, and lacks culture (he thinks "The Blue Danube" is a blues song, for example, 244), but he does his best to keep Red's funeral as dignified as possible.

847 Joe 5

There are five characters identified only as Joe in the fictions. This one appears in Intruder in the Dust, where both Edmunds and the narrator call him a "boy"; he is even referred to at one point as "Edmunds' boy," a loaded phrase in the cultural context of Faulkner's world, but in the immediate narrative context this means 'the boy that Edmunds mentioned' rather than defining a family relationship or the dynamic of an interracial relationship. Joe is the son of one of the tenant farmers on Edmunds' plantation (4, 5, etc.). The name Lucas calls him by is Joe (7).

846 Joe 4

There are five characters in the fictions identified only as "Joe." This one has the most significant role to play as the unlikely agent of justice in "Hand upon the Waters." He is “a man not large, but with tremendous arms and shoulders; an adult, yet with something childlike about him” (68). Like Lonnie Grinnup, Joe has severe mental disabilities, being “deaf and dumb” (68). Joe, an “orphan” (70, 71), was “adopted” by Lonnie Grinnup, and he remains fiercely loyal to Lonnie after Lonnie's death.

845 Joe 3

There are five characters in the fictions identified only as "Joe." This one is the deputy who drives the sheriff's car back to town after Cotton has been captured in "The Hound" (163). Presumably the same deputy is the one driving the car earlier, when it picks up the sheriff at Varner's store. No other details about him are given.

395 Joe 1

There are five characters identified only as "Joe" in the fictions. This Joe is the young bookkeeper who plays tennis with Horace and Frankie at Belle Mitchell's in Flags in the Dust.

394 Jody Varner

Jody Varner appears in seven different fictions, as the manager of Varner's Store and the brother of Eula Varner. In both those roles he is not a prepossessing figure. It's always clear that his father Will is the owner of the store; the most original thing Jody does during his tenure is to hire Flem Snopes as a clerk - though that turns out to be his biggest mistake. The narrator of "Spotted Horses" predicts at the time that in ten years, "it would be Jody clerking for Flem Snopes" (166); it doesn't take Flem nearly that long to displace him, though Jody remains the nominal manager.

392 Jingus

In "Raid" and again in The Unvanquished, Jingus is a slave of the Hawks, who live in his cabin after their main house was burned down by Union troops. On Bayard's previous visit to Hawkhurst, Jingus showed him the railroad. It is not known if he is still at Hawkhurst at the time of this visit, or if, like numerous other Negroes in the story who emancipate themselves, he has decided to follow the Union army when it moves on.

844 Jim 2

In The Hamlet one of the deputies who help the Sheriff capture Mink is named Jim. He drives the surrey in which they carry the prisoner back to Jefferson.

391 Jim 1

In "Fool about a Horse," this Jim is Pat Stamper's assistant in the horse- and mule-trading business. We hear him called "Jim" only once, by Stamper (130); the narrator refers to him instead with variations of "that nigger" (127, etc.) But it's important to note that the narrator's vocabulary tells us a lot about the racist world in which the narrator has grown up, but nothing about the man named Jim. In addition to that word, the narrator calls him a "magician" and "a artist" (123, 127). Jim displays a genius for "doctoring" horses and mules to disguise their flaws.

843 Jesus 2

There are two characters named "Jesus" in the fictions. This Jesus, Nancy's husband, is described in "That Evening Sun" as "a short black man, with a razor scar down his face." He has been missing since he threatened Nancy in the kitchen of the Compson house, saying that he might kill the white man responsible for her pregnancy ("I can cut down the vine it did come off of," 292). Nancy believes that Jesus went to Memphis but has returned to do her harm. While Jesus directly appears only once, the story is haunted by the possibility of his return.

390 Jesus 1

There are two different characters named "Jesus" in the fictions. This "Jesus" - who appears to the black congregation during the Easter church service in The Sound and the Fury and to Goodyhay in the middle of combat during World War II in The Mansion - is the biblical one.

388 Jefferson Davis

Jefferson Davis was President of the Confederate States of America for the duration of the Civil War. Although he was born in Kentucky and lived briefly in Louisiana, at the time he was elected to lead the South he had spent almost forty years in Mississippi, and had represented the state in Washington in both the House and the Senate for many years. Despite this Mississippi connection, however, he is mentioned only four times in the fictions, and curiously, mostly by non-Southerners.

842 Jake 1

The barnstormer named Jake in "Death's Drag" is "also a Jew" (like Ginsfarb). Dressed in a suit and "handsome in a dull quiet way" (188), he looks to the narrator like "a man of infrequent speech" (unlike Ginsfarb). It's worth noting that although the narrator identifies the two men as Jewish, he qualifies that by saying that "the spectators saw" that they "were of a different race from themselves, without being able to say what the difference was" (188).

387 Jake 2

The character named Jake in "Beyond" mows the Judge's lawn and during the Judge's life leaves a flower "in its season, . . . fresh and recent and unblemished, on the morning coffee tray" for the Judge's lapel (783).

841 Mrs. Farmer (Jailer)

In Requiem for a Nun Cecilia Farmer's mother, who is married to the Yoknapatawpha County "jailor," apparently performs all domestic duties such as washing or drying dishes with her husband's assistance, because Cecilia's "frail hands" are not capable of the tasks (180).

839 Celia Cook|Cecilia Farmer

Faulkner tells the story about the young girl in Jefferson during the Civil War who writes her name on a window pane with a diamond ring three different times, each time changing the details. In The Unvanquished the girl is named Celia Cook; in Intruder in the Dust she is unnamed; in Requiem for a Nun - which develops her action into a poignant symbol of persistence and temporality - her name is Cecilia Farmer. The story is apparently based on a real event in the history of Oxford, Faulkner's home town.

838 Unnamed Jailer 2

In "Monk," this "jailor" is there along with the "other prisoners" in the county jail when Monk attempts to "make a speech" after his arrest (42). (According to the "Corrected Texts" that Noel Polk edited for Vintage International, Faulkner spelled "jailer" with an 'e' in "That Evening Sun," "An Error in Chemistry" and Intruder in the Dust with an 'o' in "Monk," Requiem for a Nun and The Reivers.

837 Unnamed Jailer 1

The jailer in "That Evening Sun" is characterized only by his actions. He cuts Nancy down when she tries to hang herself in jail and then beats her. (According to the "Corrected Texts" that Noel Polk edited for Vintage International, Faulkner spelled "jailer" with an 'e' in "That Evening Sun," "An Error in Chemistry" and Intruder in the Dust with an 'o' in "Monk," Requiem for a Nun and The Reivers.

836 Unnamed Jailer 3

The unnamed jailer in "An Error in Chemistry" who discovers that Flint has somehow escaped from his cell without leaving a trace himself leaves no trace as a character - i.e. this jailer is not described in any way. (According to the "Corrected Texts" that Noel Polk edited for Vintage International, Faulkner spelled "jailer" with an 'e' in "That Evening Sun," "An Error in Chemistry" and Intruder in the Dust with an 'o' in "Monk," Requiem for a Nun and The Reivers.

384 Mrs. Andrew Jackson

President Andrew Jackson's wife, born Rachel Donelson, had been married before meeting him, and there was a legal question about the validity of their marriages - marriages plural, because they had marry a second time after her divorce was finalized. During the presidential campaign of 1828 Jackson's political opponents repeatedly (and unfairly) attacked her along with him. She died between the election and his inauguration, and so was never a First Lady.

385 Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson first achieved fame as a military leader in the War of 1812 with the British and in later conflicts with the Creek and the Seminole Indians. As commander of American forces in the 'old southwest,' which included Mississippi, he negotiated treaties with other tribes; "A Courtship" mentions the one he signed with the Chickasaw that lived in the region where Yoknapatawpha imaginatively exists. Jackson became the seventh President of the U.S.

383 Isham

In "Delta Autumn" and again in Go Down, Moses, Isham is "the oldest Negro" on the hunting expedition (273, 337). He attends to the needs of the white hunters in the camp. He takes particular care of Ike McCaslin, both physically by preparing his bed and emotionally by "warning" him about the young woman who visits the camp (277, 340).

382 Huey Long

Huey Pierce Long Jr. served as the governor of Louisiana from 1928 to 1932 and was a member of the United States Senate from 1932 until his assassination in 1935. The narrator of "Knight's Gambit" compares Harriss to him for wanting to build an expensive concrete road that he himself would never use "just as Huey Long in Louisiana had made himself founder owner and supporter of what his uncle said was one of the best literary magazines anywhere, without ever once looking in-side it probably nor even caring what the people who wrote and edited it thought of him" (241).

835 Sheriff Hampton 3

At least two and probably three of the Yoknapatawpha county sheriffs are named "Hampton." They are all named, or nicknamed, "Hub," except for one "Hope Hampton." They appear in five novels and one short story. While the scholarly consensus is that there are two Sheriff Hamptons, our data suggests that there are three: grandfather, father and son - or perhaps great-grandfather, grandson and great-grandson. This youngest of them is definitely the son of a Sheriff Hampton in both the novels in which he appears.

834 Hampton, Parents of Sheriff Hope

The narrator of Intruder in the Dust presumably refers to both of Hope Hampton's parents in the phrase identifying him as "the son of farmers" (105).

833 Sheriff Hampton's Daughter

The married daughter of Sheriff and Mrs. Hampton lives in Memphis, where she is expecting a child during the events of Intruder in the Dust.

832 Mrs. Hope Hampton

The wife of Sheriff Hope Hampton in Intruder in the Dust is in Memphis, where the couple's expectant daughter lives.

381 Sheriff Hampton 2

At least two and probably three of the Yoknapatawpha county sheriffs are named "Hampton." They are all named, or nicknamed, "Hub," except for one "Hope Hampton." They appear in five novels and one short story. While the scholarly consensus is that there are two Sheriff Hamptons, our data suggests that there are three: grandfather, father and son - or perhaps great-grandfather, grandson and great-grandson.

831 Sheriff Hampton 1

At least two and probably three of the Yoknapatawpha county sheriffs are named "Hampton." They are all named, or nicknamed, "Hub," except for one "Hope Hampton." They appear in five novels and one short story. While the scholarly consensus is that there are two Sheriff Hamptons, our data suggests that there are three: grandfather, father and son - or perhaps great-grandfather, grandson and great-grandson. In either case, this is the earliest Hampton, who is is county sheriff in two novels, both set around the turn into the 20th century: The Hamlet and The Reivers.

830 Houston's Common Law Wife

In The Hamlet Jack Houston lives with this woman for four years in El Paso, after taking her out of a Galveston brothel seven years before. Although they are never married, she is recognized among the El Paso townsfolk as his wife. He renounces their common law marriage to return to Yoknapatawpha. His wife offers to accompany him to Mississippi and to tolerate the woman he expects to marry, but she curses him repeatedly when he abandons her and leaves her half of his savings.

829 Houston's Father

A "fierce thin wiry man" in The Hamlet (233), Jack Houston's father is a farmer of some wealth with a large section of land that is worked by sharecroppers. He has a somewhat strained relationship with his son, whom he teaches to farm. His eventual death causes Jack to return home after thirteen years away.

828 Houston's Mother

According to The Hamlet, Jack Houston's mother spoiled him before her untimely death. She "had taught him to write his name before she died at last and so gave up trying to compel his father to send him to the school" (236).

827 Houston

The "younger of the two negroes" who work in the restaurant that occupies the back half of Rogers' store in Flags in the Dust. He has a "broad untroubled" and "reliable sort of face" (120). In return for serving setups to Young Bayard and Rafe MacCallum, they share some of Henry MacCallum's moonshine whisky with him. (He is not related to the Houston who appears in the Snopes trilogy.)

380 Jack|Zack Houston

Houston has no first name when he makes his first appearance, as one of the Bundrens' neighbors who attend Addie's funeral. Nor is his first name given when he - or at least his absence and his corpse - become far more important in "The Hound," where he is shot and killed by another Frenchman's Bend farmer. In the Snopes trilogy he has two different first names. As Jack in The Hamlet his biography is given in some detail, and includes a Negro mistress, a thirteen-year period of wandering around the U.S.

379 General Hooker

General 'Fighting Joe' Hooker briefly had command of the Union's Army of the Potomac. He is best known for leading a superior Union army to a resounding defeat at Lee's hands at the 1863 battle of Chancellorsville, when (according to Cass Edmonds' account in Go Down, Moses) Stonewall Jackson's men "rolled up the flank which Hooker believed could not be turned" while Hooker himself was "drinking rum toddies and telegraphing Lincoln that he had defeated Lee" (272).

377 Hoke 1

In "Fool about a Horse" Hoke is an offstage character who owns the pasture on the road between Frenchman's Bend and Jefferson where Pat Stamper sets up his camp. (There is also a character named only "Hoke" in Go Down, Moses who owns a sawmill in a different part of the county. Neither of these appears in their texts, and they might be the same Hoke, but it seems more likely that Faulkner is thinking of different characters.)

826 Hoke 2

In Go Down, Moses, Hoke is presumably the owner of the sawmill and commissary where the log-train stops to take Boon and Ike to and from Memphis. (There is also a character named only "Hoke" in "Fool about a Horse" who owns a pasture in a different part of the county. Neither of these appears in their texts, and they might be the same Hoke, but it seems more likely that Faulkner is thinking of different characters.)

376 Herman Short

In both "Fool about a Horse" and The Hamlet, Herman Short is an earlier owner of the horse that is the source of the trouble.

825 Henry 3

The Henry in The Mansion works as Houston's farmhand.

824 Henry 2

Both "A Point of Law" and the revised version of that story Faulkner wrote for Go Down, Moses include a "deputy marshal" who sits inside the courthouse chewing a toothpick (221, 70). The novel version identifies him as an "oldish white man" whom Lucas knows from another context (70). In both texts the Judge calls him "Henry" (222, 72).

373 Henry 1

The Henry in The Sound and the Fury is the elementary school classmate who - in one of Quentin's fragmentary memories - answers the teacher's question that Quentin can't, about the discoverer of the Mississippi River.

372 Hamp Worsham

Mollie's brother Hamp in both "Go Down, Moses" and the chapter with that title in Go Down, Moses is an "old man" with a "fringe of white hair" and a belly that is "bloated from the vegetables" on which he lives but whose face resembles that of "a Roman senator" (263, 360 - except that the comparison is to "a Roman general" in the novel). He and his wife join Mollie in mourning her grandson. The "Molly's brother" who works for Eunice Habersham in Intruder in the Dust is the same character (117).

371 Grumby's Gang

The gang that rides with Grumby in two of the Unvanquished stories - "The Unvanquished" and "Vendee" - takes advantage of the lawless conditions in the region during the later years of the Civil War to pillage, terrorize and murder, without regard to race or gender, the civilians who have remained at home while the white male population is off at the fighting. Two of them - Bowden and Bridger - are given names in the story. It is not clear how many others there are. In "The Unvanquished" Bayard writes that there are "about fifty or sixty" men in the gang (93).

370 Grumby

The outlaw named Grumby seems designed to strike every possible reader - regardless of race or region - as a villain. He first appears in the short story "The Unvanquished," as the leader of Grumby's Independents, an irregular group intent on terrorizing the Mississippi countryside, and the depredations of his gang make his name a source of terror to both the black and the white inhabitants of Yoknapatawpha.

369 Aaron Rideout|Grover Cleveland Winbush

This character - V.K. Ratliff's partner in the Jefferson restaurant that ultimately becomes Flem's, and then later the town's night watchman - is named Aaron Rideout when he first appears, in The Hamlet. In the next two volumes of the Snopes trilogy he appears as Grover Cleveland Winbush. (When Random House published the trilogy in one volume in 1964, they regularized his character as Winbush in all three novels.)

368 George Wyatt

In "Skirmish at Sartoris" and again in the chapter with that name in The Unvanquished, George Wyatt is a former member of Colonel John Sartoris' "troop" (58, 187) and a key ally in his campaign to keep freed blacks from either voting or being elected. The Wyatts whom Faulkner had written about in his earlier fictions, Flags in the Dust and "A Rose for Emily," belong to the town's upper class, but there is no overt indication that George is a member of that family or (other than the fact that he is literate) about his own rank, in society or in the army.

1335 George 2

The character named George who appears in The Hamlet is one of the deputies who help the Sheriff capture Mink. He objects to the Sheriff's decision to take Mink to jail by a back route.

367 George 1

The George who appears in Sanctuary seems to be the regular porter on the train between Oxford and Holly Springs. Clarence Snopes invariably tips him with a cigar instead of cash, but when Horace asks George what he is going to do with it, he replies "I wouldn't give it to nobody I know" (177).

366 General Stonewall Jackson

General Thomas Jackson - better known as Stonewall Jackson, a nickname he earned in the first major battle of the Civil War - was a corps commander in Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. He is mentioned in eight of the fictions. What Mr. Compson in Absalom! calls Jackson's "ruthless tactical skill" was demonstrated in a number of battles (223), including the 1862 campaign "in the [Shenandoah] Valley" referred to in Go Down, Moses (274), when he successfully thwarted three Union armies. His high status among the whites in Yoknapatawpha is attested to in several ways.

365 General Smith

A Union general named Smith is mentioned in four of the Yoknapatawpha fictions. His first name never appears. There were two Union Generals named Smith who fought Confederate Nathan Bedford Forrest in Mississippi at various times after the fall of Vicksburg. General William Sooy Smith was defeated by Forrest on February 22, 1864 in the Battle of Okolona, and did in fact fight Forrest "up and down the road to Memphis" - as Faulkner's General Smith does in "The Unvanquished" and again in the novel with that name (79, 128).

364 General Sherman

General William T. Sherman was a Union general during the Civil War who led troops in battles that ranged from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean. His service in the war's western theater partially accounts for the fact that his name is mentioned in nine different fictions - and he himself, according to Faulkner's mythical history, was in Yoknapatawpha at least once: "Wash" notes that Sutpen's slaves emancipated themselves by following in the wake of the Union forces when "Sherman passed through the plantation" (537).

363 General Robert E. Lee

Robert E. Lee, the most famous of the generals who led the Confederate forces during the Civil War, is mentioned in 11 different Yoknapatawpha fictions. For most of the war he was in command of the Army of Northern Virginia, where the Confederate regiment mustered in Jefferson was fighting, but at the beginning of 1865, the last year of the war, he was appointed General-in-Chief of the Confederate States Army. He never appears in person.

362 General John Pemberton

The Confederate General whom Ringo and Bayard take turns playing in "Ambuscade" and again in The Unvanquished, John Pemberton, was a historical figure. A career Army officer born in the North, Pemberton decided at the start of the Civil War to serve in the Confederate army - in part because he had married a southerner and in part because he had lived in the South for many years. He was in command of Vicksburg during Grant's 1862-1863 campaign against that river town, and surrendered it to the Union forces on the Fourth of July, 1863.

823 General Albert Johnston

On the list of Civil War military leaders that appears in Requiem for a Nun, there are "two Johnstons" (188). There were actually three Confederate Generals named Johnston, but it's likely that Faulkner is thinking of Joseph, who has his own character entry, and Albert S. Johnston, who was killed early in the War but not, according to the narrative, before he would have heard the Confederates' "shrill hackle-lifting yelling" during the fighting (188). (The other possibility is the less famous Robert D. Johnston. Only 'Joe' Johnston appears in other fictions.

361 General Joseph Johnston

The historical figure General Joseph Johnston - often referred to as Joe - is mentioned in seven Yoknapatawpha fictions, though he doesn't appear in any of them. For much of the Civil War he was in charge of Confederate forces in the western theater, which included Mississippi.

360 General Grant

Ulysses Grant ended the Civil War as the Commander-in-Chief of all Union forces, and soon afterward became the nation's 18th President. He never appears directly in the Yoknapatawpha fictions, but is mentioned in ten of them, always in connection with his leadership of the Union Army of Tennessee during and after the Vicksburg Campaign of 1862-1863. The reference to him in Sanctuary says he "came through the county" of Yoknapatawpha during that period (8; see also "Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard," 136).

359 General Van Dorn

The historical figure Earl Van Dorn was a Major General who led Confederate forces during much of the fighting in Mississippi until he was murdered in 1863 by a man claiming that Van Dorn was having an affair with his wife. On 20 December 1862 he led a successful attack on General Grant's military supplies at Holly Springs, Mississippi, which was relocated by Faulkner to Jefferson in the novel Light in August, where it becomes the event in which Reverend Hightower's grandfather is killed.

Pages