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Code title biography
358 Gavin Breckbridge

Mentioned in "Raid" and "Skirmish at Sartoris," and again in The Unvanquished, Gavin Breckbridge was engaged to Drusilla before the Civil War, which means it is almost certain that he belonged to the upper class. He never appears directly in Faulkner's fiction, but his death while fighting for the Confederacy at the Battle of Shiloh in 1862 marks the moment when Drusilla - as Bayard puts it in "Skirmish" and again in the novel - "deliberately tried to unsex herself" (60, 189).

355 Eustace Graham

In Flags in the Dust Eustace Graham is "a young lawyer" who doesn't realize Young Bayard is drunk when he tries to introduce Sartoris to a fellow veteran named Gratton (125). He plays a much larger role in Sanctuary as the District Attorney who prosecutes Lee Goodwin. According to Horace, he is a "damn little squirt" (185) who probably pressured the hotel into turning Ruby out. According to the narrator, he has "a club foot, which had probably elected him to the office he now held" (261).

354 Eugene Debs

In Flags in the Dust the owner of the restaurant on the Square refers to "a man like Debs" as a better candidate for President than Woodrow Wilson (122); in The Mansion, at the other end of Faulkner's career, "Eugene Debs" is among the people on the list provided by Charles Mallison of "everybody they called communists now" (237). The historical Eugene V. Debs founded the International Workers of the World (IWW), and was the Socialist Party of America's candidate for President in 1904, 1908, 1912 and 1920.

822 Grier, Grandfather of Res

The man the narrator of "Shall Not Perish" calls "Grandpap" is actually his father's grandfather. Sounding like the boy he is, the narrator says he is "old, so old you just wouldn't believe it" (111). In his dotage all he talks about is "the Confederate war," though the narrative does not say how he was involved in the Civil War (112). (The narrator's mother's grandfather also served in the Civil War, but his last name wouldn't have been Grier.)

821 Unnamed Great-Grandmother of Mrs. Grier

In "Shall Not Perish," when Mrs. Grier consoles Major de Spain for the loss of his son in the early days of World War Two, she mentions her own grandfather who fought in the Civil War, adding that "I reckon his mother didn't know why [he had to enlist] either, but I reckon he did" (109).

820 Unnamed Grandfather of Mrs. Grier

Mrs. Grier mentions this character in "Shall Not Perish" when she is consoling Major de Spain for the loss of his son: "my grandfather was in that old one there too" (109), meaning the Civil War.

819 Marsh

Maw Grier's brother Marsh fought and was wounded in World War I. For Mrs. Grier in "Two Soldiers," her brother's decision to enlist in 1917 gives her a way to appreciate why in 1941 her oldest son Pete has "got to go" to the another war. For Mr. Grier, however, Marsh's "actual wound on the battlefields of France" means the family has already contributed "enough" to U.S. war efforts (85). Mrs. Grier mentions her brother again in "Shall Not Perish."

818 Grier Ancestors

The Grier family appears in three stories from the early 1940s, but only the last of them - "Shall Not Perish" (1943) - mentions first generations of Griers in Yoknapatawpha. They first farmed the land that seems to have been passed from one generation to the next.

440 Unnamed Mother of Mrs. Grier

Mrs. Res Grier mentions her mother in both "Two Soldiers" and "Shall Not Perish." Like her mother, she says, whose son was wounded in France in the first World War, she cannot understand why the sons of mothers (including her own Pete) have to fight in wars.

729 Boy Grier

Unlike the upper-class boy narrators of Faulkner's previous fictions, the unnamed eight-year-old who narrates the three 'Grier' stories in the early 1940s - "Two Soldiers," "Shingles for the Lord" and "Shall Not Perish" - narrates from within the class of impoverished farmers who subsist on the poor land around Frenchman's Bend. His concerns are closely tied to his family - mother, father and brother Pete - but in the first and last of the stories Faulkner also uses him to represent his caste in a new context, the second World War.

460 Pete Grier

In "Two Soldiers" Pete Grier, the oldest of the two Grier sons, enlists in the Army after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. "I got to go," he says; "I jest ain't going to put up with no folks treating the United States that way" (83). Before December 7, 1941, he worked on his family's farm in Frenchman's Bend. The "ten acres" of land he himself owns was given to him by his father "when he graduated from the Consolidated" (82). According to his younger brother, who idolizes him, Pete was a very hard worker: "He never got behind like Pap, let alone stayed behind" (82).

446 Mrs. Res Grier

In "Two Soldiers," the first of the three stories about the Grier family that Faulkner published in 1942 and 1943, the mother of the 'soldiers' is called "Maw." Unlike her shiftless husband, although she wishes her son Pete wasn't determined to enlist, she accepts his decision to do so. Through her tears, she sends him off with mended and clean clothes and "a shoe box of vittles" (85). She also functions as something of a bridge between the World Wars, as her brother served in World War I.

353 Res Grier

Res, the farmer at the head of the Grier family, appears very differently in each of the three stories Faulkner wrote about the family during the early 1940s.

352 Doctor Alford

Doctor Alford appears in Flags in the Dust as a "newcomer" to Jefferson in his "thirties" (93). He shares offices with Dr. Peabody but expresses impatience and often contempt for Peabody's traditional ideas about the practice of medicine. He is courting Narcissa Benbow, but without arousing much interest in her. He is mentioned in As I Lay Dying when MacGowan tells Jody to send Dewey Dell "upstairs to Alford's office" when she asks "to see the doctor that works" there (241).

351 Doctor Worsham

In the short story "The Unvanquished" and again in the chapter titled "Riposte in Tertio" in The Unvanquished, Bayard recalls the minister of Jefferson's Episcopal Church in the days before the War. Like many other white Yoknapatawphans, he is probably away in the War.

350 Doctor Lucius Peabody

Doctor Lucius Peabody is the only character who appears in the first three Yoknapatawpha novels: Flags in the Dust, The Sound and the Fury and As I Lay Dying. He is only mentioned by Quentin in the second, but makes memorable appearances in the other two. According to Flags, he is "the fattest man" in the county (94). His medical practice takes him "out at any hour of the twenty-four in any weather and for any distance, over practically impassable roads in a lopsided buckboard to visit anyone, white or black, who sent for him" (95).

817 Doctor Peabody 2

In "A Name for the City" and again in Requiem for a Nun "Doctor Peabody" is one of the "new faces" that arrive in Yoknapatawpha after the first group of pioneers and becomes "old Doctor Habersham's successor" as the community's physician (206). He is presumably an ancestor of the Doctor Peabody who in other fictions takes care of Yoknapatawpha's sick and wounded until well into the twentieth century, but neither text ever specifies the relationship between the two men. This earlier Peabody provides laudanum to add to the whiskey given to the militia for their celebration.

349 Doctor Habersham

Doctor Habersham is one of the original three white settlers in Yoknapatawpha, or as it's put in Intruder in the Dust, the first text to mention him, one of the men "who had ridden horseback into the county before its boundaries had ever been surveyed and located and named" (73). According to Requiem for a Nun, in fact, with his "worn black bag of pills and knives" he was so important to the settlement that for a time the place that became Jefferson was known as "Doctor Habersham's" (202).

816 Unnamed Doctor 9

In "Hand upon Waters" the insurance company doctor who examines Lonnie Grinnup in Mottstown "had never seen Lonnie Grinnup before, but he had known Tyler Ballenbaugh for years," and so has no qualms about qualifying Lonnie for the policy that Tyler pays for (77).

815 Unnamed Doctor 3

The second of the two unnamed doctors in Sanctuary is the Florida doctor whom Popeye's mother consults about her sickly child; he tells her to "feed him eggs cooked in olive oil" (305). (It is possible that Faulkner is making a strange and subversive reference to the cartoon characters Popeye and Olive Oyl; both these E. C. Segar characters had appeared in newspapers at least two years before Sanctuary was published.)

814 Unnamed Doctor 2

The first of the two unnamed doctors who appear in Sanctuary is the Jefferson physician who attends Ruby's child; after her child has a bad night in the hotel, Ruby tells Horace that "I finally got the doctor" (135). The doctor who appears in all three previous Yoknapatawpha novels is named Peabody, described as the fattest man in Yoknapatawpha County, but this doctor is someone else, "a young man with a small black bag" whom Horace obviously has never seen before (135).

813 Unnamed Doctors

Along with the similarly vague group of "ministers" (123), this group of "the doctors" in town visit Emily Grierson's house to persuade her to relinquish her father's corpse (124).

812 Unnamed Doctor 12

In The Reivers the country doctor whom Lucius sees in Parsham is "an iron-gray man" at least sixty years old (185). His white shirt and black coat are both unclean, and he "smells like something [that] isn't just alcohol" (185). According to Butch, it's ether. Doctors used ether as an anesthetic, but it was also ab-used as an addictive drug. For all his shortcomings, the narrative treats this doctor - and his 35-year-old memory of a visit to a Memphis brothel - kindly.

811 Unnamed Doctor 10

This is the doctor in The Hamlet who inspects Mink Snopes after his suicide attempt. (This very minor character is probably also the same "doctor" as the one who examines Cotton in the story "The Hound," but since Faulkner has changed 'Cotton' to 'Mink' when he revised that story for inclusion in the novel, it seems appropriate to enter this doctor as a different character too.)

810 Unnamed Doctor 8

"The doctor" in Absalom! treats Charles E. S-V. Bon after the fight at "the negro ball" (164). (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

809 Unnamed Doctor 7

There are over a dozen Jefferson physicians in the fictions, but the doctor in the story "Uncle Willy" is invented by Willy as a way to get his rich sister in Texas to buy him a car. According to Willy's letter to her, this doctor prescribes a car as a way to save Willy from having "to walk back and forth to the store" in his fragile health (235). According to the narrator, Willy wants the car in order to get to the moonshine stills in the hills outside Jefferson and to the brothels in Memphis.

808 Unnamed Doctor 5

"The doctor" - a phrase which suggests the town has only one doctor - appears three times in "Miss Zilphia Gant": twice to treat Zilphia, and once to treat her mother (372, 375, 380). On his first visit he tells Mrs. Gant that Zilphia "would have to have companionship, to play with children of her own age and out-of-doors" (372). (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

807 Doctor Crawford

The doctor who works at Hoke's sawmill appears anonymously in "Lion" and by name, as Doctor Crawford, in Go Down, Moses. He's not a veterinarian, but when in the short story Boon shows up "just before daylight," and "drags him out of bed like a sack of meal," he goes to the hunting camp and works on the wounded Lion (196). In "Lion" he also treats Boon, and in the novel treats both Boon and Sam.

550 Unnamed Doctor 1

This is the Jefferson doctor in "Dry September" whom Minnie Cooper's friends send for when she suffers a nervous breakdown. He is "hard to locate" (181). (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

806 Unnamed Doctor 11

This is the doctor whom Lucas Beauchamp goes to get when Zack Edmonds’s wife has trouble in labor in Go Down, Moses; he arrives too late to prevent her death. (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

348 Unnamed Doctor 4

The "doctor" who examines Cotton after he is brought to jail in "The Hound" is not named, or individualized in any way (163). (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

347 Devries

In both "By the People" and The Mansion Devries is the good man from an (invented) county east of Yoknapatawpha who challenges Clarence Snopes in a political race for Congress; in the story it's the 1952 election, while for the novel Faulkner moves it back to 1946. That change necessitates a revision in his biography. In "By the People" Devries has been a soldier "in that decade between 1942 and 1952" (133), and comes back from fighting in Korea with a chest full of medals, including "the top one" (134) - i.e. the Congressional Medal of Honor - and a "mechanical leg" (136).

805 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 11

In The Town this deputy brings a suitcase to Montgomery Ward Snopes' studio, so Sheriff Hampton can lock up Snopes' "album" (174) of ""French postcards" (171). (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

804 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 10

In Intruder in the Dust this "deputy" drives the car in which Sheriff Hampton brings Lucas Beauchamp to jail (42). (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

803 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 9

In "Error in Chemistry," this unnamed deputy accompanies the sheriff to investigate the initial call from Joel Flint about his wife's death. He may or may not be the same as one of the named deputies in the story.

802 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 8

In "Tomorrow," Quick identifies this unnamed man as "the deputy or bailiff or whatever he was" (105). He accompanies the Thorpe brothers when they arrive in Frenchman's Bend with a court order for custody of their sister's child. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

801 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 2

In "The Hound" there is a character referred to as "the second deputy" in the group of officers who arrest Mink Snopes (162). He rides in the front seat of the sheriff's "battered Ford" car with "the driver," a man named Joe (163). (Joe is presumably the story's 'first' deputy.)

800 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 14

This is the second of the two deputy sheriffs The Mansion; he is only mentioned, as transporting a prisoner from Greenville.

799 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 13

This is the first of the two deputy sheriffs who appear in The Mansion; he escorts Mink to Parchman Penitentiary. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

798 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 1

This deputy sheriff escorts Lee Goodwin on his trips between the jail and the courthouse in Sanctuary. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

797 Unnamed Wife of Deputy Sheriff

In "Pantaloon in Black" and again in Go Down, Moses, the wife of the deputy who narrates much of the last section of the story is described as "a stout woman, handsome once, graying now and with a neck definitely too short, who looked not harried at all but choleric" (252, 147). She is impatient with her husband, and preoccupied with her own concerns; her rapid movements between kitchen and dining room suggest her lack of interest in her husband's account of a black man's lynching.

796 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 6

This is one of the two deputies mentioned in "Monk." This deputy transports Monk to the state penitentiary by train. He may or may not be the same deputy who earlier arrested Monk. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

795 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 5

This is one of the two deputies mentioned in "Monk." This one is the officer who arrests Monk in the gas station. He may or may not be the same one who later transports him to the state penitentiary by train. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

548 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 3

In "Smoke," this deputy follows up the health officer's report about Old Anse's behavior in the cemetery, and discovers the old man's body. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

794 Unnamed Murdered Deputy

Chapter 31 of Sanctuary begins with Popeye being arrested (wrongly) "for the murder of a policeman in a small Alabama town" (302). Later, after he has been (wrongly) convicted for the crime, the novel provides one detail about the victim: according to Popeye's jailer, "folks here says that deppity invited killing" for the "two-three mean things folks knows about" (313).

547 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 15

In The Reivers this unnamed deputy holds Ludus after Boon shoots at him, and then escorts Ludus to Judge Stevens' office. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

478 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 7

This unnamed deputy recounts the second and last section of "Pantaloon in Black" as both a short story and a chapter in Go Down, Moses, although much of the language used to characterize him serves to undermine his authority as a narrator. He is "spent" and "a little hysterical too" after both the manhunt for Rider and the lynching (252), and his wife shows no sympathy at all for him or for the story he's trying to tell her. Instead, she offers the narrative’s only portrait of the deputy sheriff: "You sheriffs! Sitting around that courthouse all day long talking.

346 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 4

In Absalom! the "second man" in the ambulance that Rosa Coldfield takes out to the Sutpen place at the end of 1909 is "perhaps a deputy sheriff" (299).

792 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 12

In "Uncle Willy" the man who takes Darl Bundren in handcuffs to the mental hospital is described as "a fat deputy sheriff that was smoking a cigar" (228); he did not appear in Faulkner's original account of this event, at the end of the novel As I Lay Dying (1930). (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

791 Anse Bundren

Anse Bundren is a farmer by vocation, but he is perhaps more accurately described with a term Faulkner's fiction regularly applies to the Snopeses: parasite. Unlike Flem, however, Anse is rendered comically rather than as a threat to the social order. He is described as a "kind of tall, gaunted man" (203). Physically his most striking feature seems to be his hair; Peabody calls it "pushed and matted up . . . like a dipped rooster" (44).

790 Addie Bundren

Although Addie Bundren only appears in As I Lay Dying, she is one of the most memorable women characters in the Yoknapatawpha fictions, and in her impact on her children both before and after her death a great example of the role 'absence' plays in Faulkner's world. A former school teacher who came to Frenchman's Bend from Jefferson, Addie is the matriarch of the Bundren family who is lying on her death bed when the narrative begins. Her spiteful wish to be buried in Jefferson initiates and drives the journey at the center of the novel.

345 Darl Bundren

Darl is Anse and Addie Bundren's second child in As I Lay Dying. Chronologically this places him between Cash and Jewel. But psychologically he has no place: unlike his older and his younger brother, he was born completely outside the circle of his mother's love. The most prolific narrator in the novel (he narrates 19 chapters), he also seems to be omniscient, as he often narrates events at which he is not present (nor does he narrate them as though he is recounting a story he was told).

344 Dan

In "Gold Is Not Always" and again in Go Down, Moses Dan is the head stableman on the McCaslin-Edmonds' place, and is one of the two Negroes who help Roth search for "Alice Ben Bolt," the valuable mule who has gone missing. Dan immediately recognizes the mule's footprint and (as Roth "would realize" later) also recognizes the footprints of the man who led Alice away (229, 81). The fact that Dan doesn't tell Roth about the man puts black employee and his white boss on opposite sides of the color line.

477 Unnamed Sheriff 11

The unnamed county sheriff who appears in "A Point of Law" is not described in any detail. In the companion short story "Gold Is Not Always," the sheriff is only mentioned. When Faulkner combined these stories into the chapter in Go Down, Moses called "The Fire and the Hearth," he describes the sheriff who plays the same roles as "a tremendous man, fat" (62). We assume these are all the same character in Faulkner's imagination.

787 Unnamed Mottstown Sheriff 1

After Joe Christmas' arrest in Light in August, the unnamed sheriff of the county that includes Mottstown encourages the crowd outside the jail to respect the law.

786 Unnamed Sheriff 7

In "Uncle Willy" the sheriff, the county's chief law enforcement officer, locks Willy's drugstore after the clerk has stolen most of its stock and disappeared. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions. Obviously in some of these cases - at least when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment - Faulkner may be thinking of the same unnamed character, or one of the half dozen "Sheriff Hampton"s who also appear in the fictions, but from the texts themselves there is no way to establish that.)

785 Unnamed Mottstown Sheriff 2

The unnamed sheriff of the county that includes Mottstown in "That Will Be Fine" is going to question Uncle Rodney about the bond theft and forgery. He later watches for Uncle Rodney's attempt to abscond with Grandpa's neighbor's wife and "all the jewelry" (281).

784 Unnamed Sheriff 10

At the end of "Hand upon the Waters" the "sheriff of the county" visits Stevens to wrap up the details of Stevens' unofficial investigation. He tries to get Stevens to confirm that Joe murdered Boyd Ballenbaugh. Stevens does not take the bait. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

673 Unnamed Sheriff 2

The sheriff never appears in "Dry September," but is mentioned by Hawkshaw when he tries to prevent the lynching: "Let's get the sheriff and do this thing right" (172). (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions. Obviously in some of these cases - at least when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment - Faulkner may be thinking of the same unnamed character, or one of the half dozen "Sheriff Hampton"s who also appear in the fictions, but from the texts themselves there is no way to establish that.)

783 Unnamed Sheriff 12

In both versions of "Go Down, Moses" - the short story and the chapter of that name in the novel Go Down, Moses - Gavin Stevens briefly considers consulting "the sheriff" for help locating Mollie Beauchamp's grandson. There are three 'sheriff's in the novel, two unnamed ones (in "The Fire and the Hearth" and "Go Down, Moses"), and Sheriff Maydew in "Pantaloon in Black." They are essentially contemporaneous, but the text does not suggest any connection between any of them - so we have created three separate "Sheriff" entries.

782 Unnamed Sheriff 13

While the sheriff of Yoknapatawpha never appears in person in "Knight's Gambit," Robert Markey mentions him when he tells Gavin Stevens that "your sheriff will have to send someone" to help take Max Harriss into custody (232). Later Stevens mentions a different officer of the law when he instructs his nephew to send a message to the Memphis police that includes this phrase: "use police per request Jefferson chief if necessary” (214). While the county sheriff is a familiar character in the Yoknapatawpha fictions, there is no other mention in them of a "chief" of police.

781 Unnamed Sheriff 8

In "Monk," the county sheriff is mentioned by negation, as a way to characterize the hill country in the eastern part of the county from which Monk hails: according to the narrator, the area is so dangerous to outsiders that not even the sheriff will go there. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

780 Unnamed Sheriff 5

The county sheriff who oversees the assessment and payment of property taxes on the Mardis-Holland property never appears directly in "Smoke." (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions. Obviously in some of these cases - at least when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment - Faulkner may be thinking of the same unnamed character, or one of the half dozen "Sheriff Hampton"s who also appear in the fictions, but from the texts themselves there is no way to establish that.)

778 Unnamed Sheriff 6

This sheriff is only mentioned in "Skirmish at Sartoris" as a story and again as a chapter in The Unvanquished. After killing the two Burdens, John Sartoris tells his followers that he plans to find the sheriff and "make bond" (208). The office of Sheriff was different from the office of Marshal that is at stake in the election. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

777 Unnamed Sheriff 3

The county sheriff who appears in Sanctuary is "a fat man, with a broad, dull face"; he arrests Lee Goodwin in the first half of the novel, and then, just before Lee is lynched, expresses his hope that the crowd outside the jail "wont do anything" (293). (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

776 Unnamed Sheriff 1

The county sheriff in The Sound and the Fury is a man with "vigorous untidy iron-gray hair and his gray eyes were round and shiny like a little boy's" (301-02). He exercises his judgment - about Jason Compson in particular - when he refuses to help Jason chase after his niece on Easter Sunday. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

775 Unnamed Sheriff 9

The antebellum "sheriff of the county" who leads the "posse" that follows and then arrests Sutpen on suspicion of having committed some kind of crime (34, 35) in Absalom! is probably not Major de Spain, who is the county sheriff in the years immediately following the Civil War.

343 Unnamed Doctor 6

The Jefferson doctor who appears twice in Light in August is not named. Some years before the events of the story, he arrives at a cabin where Gail Hightower has just delivered a stillborn Negro baby. In the novel's present he is also the doctor whom Byron Bunch contacts when Lena goes into labor in a different cabin; again he arrives too late, but this time after Hightower has successfully delivered the baby.

774 Unnamed Coroner 4

In Intruder in the Dust the coroner who is going to perform the autopsy on Jake Montgomery's body is waiting at "the undertaker's back door" when it arrives there (177).

773 Unnamed Coroner 1

The man who is referred to simply as "the coroner" in Sanctuary man may also be the local undertaker, but all one can say for certain is that he "sits over" Tommy's body as it lays in the funeral parlor trying unsuccessfully to learn the corpse's last name (113).

541 Unnamed Coroner 2

In "Hand upon the Waters," the coroner who contacts Stevens about Lonnie Grinnup’s death and presides over the inquest is described as "an old country doctor" (70). He signs the death certificate without ever suspecting the death might not have been an accident.

342 Unnamed Coroner 3

The role of the coroner who appears in both "Pantaloon in Black" and Go Down, Moses is to pronounce Rider's cause of death and return the body to Rider's relatives. The script he follows is that of the Jim Crow system.

772 Odum Tull

Odum Tull appears only once in the fictions, in "Fool About a Horse," when he gives his neighbor Vynie Snopes and her milk separator a ride back home from Jefferson in his wagon. (When Faulkner revised this story for inclusion in The Hamlet, he is essentially replaced by a farmer named Cliff Odum.)

771 Eula Tull

In As I Lay Dying Kate is one of Vernon and Cora Tull's two daughters. The way she appears in her parents' narrative sections suggests that she is clear-eyed if not angry and cynical about the place that she occupies as a poor woman. She calls out the woman who changed her mind about buying her mother's cakes as one of "those rich town ladies" (7) and even gets ahead of the plot of the novel when she predicts that Anse will "get another [wife] before cotton-picking" (34). She may also be attracted to Jewel Bundren.

770 Kate Tull

In As I Lay Dying Eula is one of the two daughters of Cora and Vernon Tull. Apparently while the Tulls were in town she bought a "bead" necklace for "twenty-five cents," perhaps to appeal to Darl Bundren, whom she watches as he passes through the Bundren house (9). Either she or her sister is the daughter Whitfield refers to at Addie's funeral as "Tull's youngest" (179).

769 Tull, Daughters of Vernon

The children of Frenchman's Bend farmer Vernon Tull and his wife are all girls, but there is no consensus among the fictions about how many daughters they have. In the earliest representation of the Tull family, As I Lay Dying, there are two, named Eula and Kate. In "Spotted Horses" there are three - none named. In The Hamlet, there are four, again not named; though one of these girls is referred to as the "biggest" when all four appear at the Snopes trial, they are described as a unit when they "turn their heads as one head" (357).

768 Tull

Among the suitors for Eula Varner listed in The Mansion are "Tulls" (130). Tulls appear in almost a dozen fictions; most of them are either Vernon Tull or identifiable as members of his immediate family. The Tull or Tulls courting Eula are unlikely to be Vernon, but presumably are somehow related to him.

491 Vernon Tull

Vernon Tull is a farmer in Frenchman's Bend who appears in ten different Yoknapatawpha fictions. In As I Lay Dying he narrates six of the novel's sections, which gives readers a particularly intimate connection to him; in these chapters he is one of the novel's more reliable commentators, particularly when he suggests that it might be a mistake for a person "to spend too much time thinking" (71).

341 Cora Tull

The wife of Vernon and the mother of a fluxuating number of daughters, Cora Tull is described by the third-person narrator of The Hamlet as a "strong, full-bosomed though slightly dumpy woman" whose face perpetually wears "an expression of grim and seething outrage . . . directed not at any Snopes or at any other man in particular but at all men, all males" (357). This is a more extreme version of the 'Cora Tull' whom readers meet in the earlier As I Lay Dying, where she narrates three sections herself, and plays a substantial role as Addie's nearest neighbor.

339 Comyn

Referred to in Flags in the Dust by Monaghan as "that big Irish devil" (387), Comyn was Royal Air Force flyer (identified in "Ad Astra" as a lieutenant) with whom Young Bayard and Johnny Sartoris flew during World War I. In "Ad Astra" he appears as a proud Irishman who disdains the English nation he has served. He is drinking heavily and looking for women or a fight or both.

338 Colonel Newberry

Colonel G. W. Newberry is the Union commander of the "--th Illinois Infantry" (77, 124). Rosa Millard tricks him into handing over mules.

337 Colonel Nathaniel G. Dick

Colonel Dick is a Union cavalryman with a "bright beard" and "hard bright eyes" who appears in "Ambuscade" and "Raid" and is mentioned in "The Unvanquished" as a short story. Across these texts as well as The Unvanquished he appears as a chivalrous gentleman who knows how to treat a lady like Rosa Millard even in the midst of the confict between Yankees and rebels.

335 Chevalier Soeur-Blonde de Vitry

Though he is mentioned in six fictions, this Frenchman remains a shadowy figure. When he first appears, during Ikkemotubbe's trip to New Orleans in "Red Leaves," the narrator notes that his "social position" is "equivocal" (317). Chevaliers were minor nobles in pre-Revolutionary France. This "Chevalier" has emigrated from Paris to the French colony of Louisiana, though two of the stories also show him back in France as an old man.

767 Charley 2

The man named "Charley" in The Reivers (146) is described by Lucius as "a switchman, a railroad man anyway," in "greasy overalls" (141). He helps load the horse into the boxcar.

334 Charley 1

The character named "Charley" in Light in August is "a young interne from the county hospital" who is a doctor's assistant (124) at the Memphis orphanage where an infant is left "on the doorstep" (133). This young man is the person who decides they should name the child "Joe Christmas." He is still working there as an intern five years later, when Joe overhears him having sex with the "dietitian" (120). ("Interne" and "dietitian" are the novel's spellings.)

333 Cassius Q. Benbow

This emancipated slave is mentioned in "Skirmish at Sartoris" and again in The Unvanquished. Before the Civil War, Cassius was called "Uncle Cash"; he was enslaved by the Benbow family and worked as their carriage driver (66, 199). He is illiterate. During the War he "run off with the Yankees" (66, 199), but has returned to Jefferson and been appointed "Acting Marshal" by the northerners who are trying to reconstruct the town's government (66, 199). It is his possible election as Marshal that precipitates the story's climax.

766 Captain Warren

In the 1932 short story "Death Drag" Captain Warren is a well-to-do war veteran who has established himself comfortably in his home town; adults and children alike know him as "an ex-army flyer" who "was in the war" (185, 188). There is actually no clear evidence in the story that Warren's home town is Jefferson, and its likely that if he did live in Yoknapatawpha he would have been mentioned in Flags in the Dust (1929), with its focus on aviators and returning wounded veterans.

765 Bookwright's Daughter

Never given a first name in "Tomorrow," this "country girl of seventeen" (90) falls for Buck Thorpe's swagger. Her father, referred to only as "Bookwright," apparently discover her during "the inevitable elopement at midnight" and shoots Buck (90). Her subsequent fate is not mentioned.

764 Bookwright

This "solid, well-to-do farmer, husband and father" from Frenchman's Bend is Gavin Stevens' client in "Tomorrow" (90). There is no way to determine if he is Odum or Homer or Cal, or yet a different member of the Bookwright|Bookright family. This Bookwright turned himself in after shooting Buck Thorpe to keep him from eloping with his daughter; the story begins during his trial for that crime.

452 Odum Bookwright

Described in The Hamlet as "sturdy short-legged black-browed ready-faced man" (63), Bookwright is one of several characters in Frenchman's Bend who keep Ratliff apprised of the goings on about the hamlet when he is gone. At the end of that novel, he and Ratliff and Armstid are swindled by Flem Snopes into purchasing the Old Frenchman’s Place - an event that is referred to again in The Mansion.

763 Mrs. Odum Bookwright

In The Hamlet Odom Bookwright mentions but does not name his wife when he tells Ratliff that she hasn't spoken of "anybody's new sewing machine in almost a year" (76).

378 Homer Bookwright

Homer Bookwright (spelled without the "w" in "By the People") is a farmer and church member in Frenchman's Bend and a minor figure in four Yoknapatawpha texts. He does, however, have a memorable line in The Mansion, when he explains the jailor's wife's interest in Montgomery Ward Snopes' career as a pornographer by asking, rhetorically, "aint she human too, even if she is a woman?" (70).

332 Herman Bookwright

There are both Bookwrights and Bookrights in Frenchman's Bend in various texts. Herman Bookwright appears in The Hamlet as one of Eula's fervent suitors, and one of the two young men from the Bend who leave the area "suddenly overnight" once it is discovered that she is pregnant - though Ratliff believes that both these young men were "just wishing they had" (140).

331 Captain Bowen

In "Raid" and again in The Unvanquished, Captain Bowen is in charge of the Union cavalry troop which Rosa, Bayard, and Ringo encounter on their way back home. Although he himself doesn't appear, one of his lieutenants says that the Captain mounted them with captured stock.

762 Lucy Pate Houston|Letty Bookright Houston

Like her husband, Mrs. Houston is mentioned in all three novels in the Snopes trilogy. Her story is essentially the same: within a year of their marriage, she is killed by his horse, a dangerous stallion. But her maiden name changes, from Lucy Pate (in The Hamlet) to Letty Bookright (in The Town), as does the brief biography provided in those first two volumes, and as do the details of her death. She comes into focus most vividly in The Hamlet. Her essential role in the trilogy is to be the reason why Houston is a widower.

330 Calvin BookwrightBookright

We can say for sure that this character lives in or near the Frenchman's Bend part of Yoknapatawpha, but otherwise our composite Bookwright|Bookright is based on interpretation. In The Town Cal Bookright is the father of the woman Zack Houston marries. In The Mansion Calvin Bookwright is a moonshiner: according to Hoke McCarron, the "stuff [he] used to make" tasted "jest like" Bushmill's, a well-known brand of Irish whiskey (190). In The Reivers "Uncle Cal Bookwright" makes moonshine whiskey that can be bought at Mack Winbush's for two dollars a gallon (12).

761 Mrs. Freeman

In The Hamlet Mrs. Freeman watches as Eck and Wall Street try to catch their horse. Eck and the boy try to stop the horse by tripping it. "She said that when it hit that rope, it looked just like one of these here great big Christmas pinwheels" (365).

357 Freeman

Freeman appears in both "Spotted Horses" and The Hamlet in connection with the auction of the ponies in Frenchman's Bend - though no first name is given in either text, and while he has a wife in The Hamlet, no other details about him are provided. In the novel Freeman ends up buying and losing one of the horses; in "Spotted Horses" he only appears driving his wagon past Varner's store several days after the auction, as Mrs Armstid is trying to get the money her husband spent back from Flem.

760 Burrington, Cousin of Nathaniel Burden

In Light in August it is this cousin of Nathaniel Burden who finds a bride in New Hampshire for him. Since the other New England relatives of the Burdens are named Burrington, we presume that's also this cousin's last name.

759 Mrs. Nathaniel Burden

In Light in August Joanna Burden's mother is Nathaniel Burden's second wife, but compared to all Joanna tells Joe Christmas about Juana, Burden's first wife after after whom she is named, Joanna says very little about her own mother, not even her name. All we know about her is that she moves to Jefferson from New Hampshire after Nathaniel writes his cousin there that he is seeking a wife who is "a good housekeeper and . . . at least thirtyfive years old" (250).

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