The Mansion, 305 (Event)

305

Unnamed Non-Mississippians

According to Gavin, "the rest of the world, at least that part of it in the United States, rates us folks in Mississippi at the lowest rung of culture" (167). This entry represents those people outside Mississippi - especially in the North.

Unnamed Non-Mississippians

According to Gavin in The Mansion, "the rest of the world, at least that part of it in the United States, rates us folks in Mississippi at the lowest rung of culture" (167). This entry represents those people outside Mississippi - especially in the North.

The Mansion, 84 (Event)

84

Unnamed Negro Train Passengers

These passengers don't appear in the novel, but their presence is evoked when the narrator sees Reba and Minnie at the Parsham station getting out of the smoking car's "Jimcrow half" of the smoking car - "where Negroes traveled" (194).

Unnamed Negro Train Passengers 2

These people don't appear in The Reivers, but their presence is evoked when the narrator sees Reba and Minnie at the Parsham depot getting out of "the Jimcrow half" of the smoking car - "where Negroes traveled" (194).

Unnamed People of Frenchman's Bend 3

The rural and poor hamlet of Frenchman's Bend appears or is referred to in 18 different Yoknapatawpha fictions; this entry focuses on one of the texts that characterizes the people who live there as a group. "Centaur in Brass" takes place after Flem Snopes comes to town, and doesn't provide a name for the place he comes from, though the references to the "country store" (149) and the auction of "a herd of half-wild mustang ponies" (150) identifies the place as the Bend.

New England in "Red Leaves" (Location)

The captain of the slave ship that carries the enslaved servant across the Atlantic is from "New England" (330).

New England

In "Red Leaves" the captain of the slave ship that carries "the Negro," Issetibbeha's enslaved "body servant," across the Atlantic is from "New England" (330). This captain is associated with drunkenness and the Bible, and his regional origin allows the story to associate slavery with the larger United States rather than just the South.

Siam in "Red Leaves" (Location)

Before 1949, the country now known as Thailand was called "Siam" by western nations. Siam appears in "Red Leaves" when, in his description of Three Basket and Louis Berry on the first page of the story, the narrator compares their faces to the appearance of "carved heads on a ruined wall in Siam or Sumatra, looming out of a mist" (313). It's not clear that this analogy would help many of Faulkner's readers see the two Indians more clearly, but it certainly locates them in an exotic context.

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