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719 Unnamed Government Agents

"Them" - this is one of the more ambiguous elements in As I Lay Dying. "Them," "they" - these are the only terms that that Anse uses to describe the people who come to his house and use "the law" to "talk me out of" Darl (37, 36). The most likely explanation of this event is the Selective Service Act of 1917, which required men between the ages of 21 and 31 to register for the draft (in 1918, it was expanded to include men between 18 and 21). That would mean Darl has been drafted and "they" are agents of the federal government.

720 Unnamed Women and Negroes

"The Unvanquished" - both the story and the novel with that title - includes an unusual reference to "white women" and "Negroes" (149, 93). The text brings these two groups together as the people in Yoknapatawpha who are equally threatened by the existence of Grumby's gang of "Independents" - though the "white women" are "frightened" while the Negroes are "tortured" (149, 93), and that it's hard to see what place Negro women occupy in this phrasing.

721 Vernon 2

In "Death Drag" Vernon owns the café where Captain Warren and Jock talk. He seems like an attentive and successful businessman; people know his place by his name, and Jock and Captain Warren seem comfortable there. He may be the same "Vernon" who is married to the Sheriff's daughter in The Sound and the Fury, though there is no direct evidence of that. He is certainly not the Vernon - Vernon Tull - who lives in Frenchman's Bend.

722 Unnamed Imagined Girl

In As I Lay Dying, both Darl and Cash believe that sex is the reason their brother Jewel sneaks out every night, and each tries to imagine whom he is "rutting" with (131). Darl thinks she is a "girl" he probably knows, but can't "say for sure" which one (132). (It turns out, as Cash says later, that "it aint a woman" at all, 133.)

723 Walter Ewell

Walter Ewell is a farmer in Yoknapatawpha, but in the six fictions where he appears or is mentioned he is always described as (to quote The Mansion) one of the "best hunters in the county" (34) - an assertion born out repeatedly on the annual hunting trips to Major de Spain's camp in the woods. When the unnamed boy in "The Bear" hunts his first deer on his own it is symbolically appropriate that "he borrows Walter Ewell's rifle" to do so (290).

724 Whitfield 2

"Whitfield's cabin" is the first "church" in Yoknapatawpha (213, 23), and presumably the Whitfield who lives there is an ancestor of the "Reverend Whitfield" who is an important character in As I Lay Dying and also appears in several other fictions. Although this original Whitfield is only mentioned in "A Name for the City" and Requiem for a Nun, it seems safe to say that he is not a full-time preacher, but a settler who holds lay services in his cabin.

725 Wilkie 2

Wendell Wilkie was the Republican candidate for President who ran against President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1940; he is mentioned in Go Down, Moses on a list of political figures that includes both Roosevelt and Hitler (322).

726 Will Legate

Will Legate appears in four fictions, primarily as an accomplished hunter. He is a member of the Yoknapatawpha hunting party in "Delta Autumn" and again in Go Down, Moses, a son of one of Ike's "old companions, whom he had taught" the discipline of hunting (268, 320).

727 Winterbottom

Never given a first name, Winterbottom is a farmer in Frenchman's Bend who has a small role in two texts and is mentioned in a third. He is present at the auction in "Spotted Horses." Light in August begins when Lena Grove walks past his farm. And Flem Snopes mentions that he boarding "at Winterbottom's" near the end of The Hamlet (388).

728 Woodrow Wilson

The 28th President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson led the country into the First World War and was still in office when Rafe MacCallum mentions his name, disparagingly, in Flags in the Dust (122). He is mentioned again in The Mansion, where the U.S. Declaration of War against Germany on April 2, 1917, is referred to as "the President's declaration" (204). In the aftermath of World War I, Wilson was one of the key promoters of the League of Nations.

729 Boy Grier

Unlike the upper-class boy narrators of Faulkner's previous fictions, the unnamed eight-year-old who narrates the three 'Grier' stories in the early 1940s - "Two Soldiers," "Shingles for the Lord" and "Shall Not Perish" - narrates from within the class of impoverished farmers who subsist on the poor land around Frenchman's Bend. His concerns are closely tied to his family - mother, father and brother Pete - but in the first and last of the stories Faulkner also uses him to represent his caste in a new context, the second World War.

730 Unnamed Married Woman 1

In As I Lay Dying, both Cash and Darl believe that sex is the reason Jewel sneaks out every night, and each tries to imagine whom he is "rutting" with (131). Cash believes she must be "a married woman somewhere," because of the sexual "daring and staying power" she seems capable of (132). (It turns out, as Cash says later, that "it aint a woman" at all, 133.)

731 Albert 2

This Albert appears in The Mansion. He is the member of Goodyhay's irregular congregation who drives the truck carrying construction materials for the church they are trying to build - and who tries to explain to Mink what unites the Goodyhay's flock across racial and other boundaries.

732 Paralee|Guster

The mother of Aleck Sander - named Paralee in Intruder in the Dust and Guster in The Town - has been a servant in the Stevens-Mallison household for a long time, perhaps her entire life. She lives in a cabin behind the white family's house. Like her employer, Maggie Mallison, she is protective about her own child, but she is also a kind of 'mammy' to Chick Mallison. She is never given a last name, but the earlier novel mentions her father Ephriam, and the later novel gives her a husband (Big Top) and another son (Top, or Little Top).

733 Alice 2

This Alice cooks for Miss Ballenbaugh in The Reivers, and very well too: after eating her food, Lucius "knows why the hunters and fishermen come back" to stay at Ballenbaugh's inn (76). Unmarried, she says she "aint studying no husband" (75).

734 Anselm Holland I

In "Smoke," the older Anselm Holland is what the people of Yoknapatawpha consider an "outlander" (4) - i.e. someone who was not only born outside the county, but who remains estranged from the community no matter how long he or she lives there. Of an unremittingly violent, misanthropic, and crass nature, he alienates his sons, desecrates the graves in the Mardis Cemetery, and allows his sons’ rightful inheritance of farm and house to go to ruin for spite.

735 Anselm Holland II

In "Smoke" Anselm Junior is one of the twin sons of Anselm Holland. He seems to have inherited his father's violent misanthropy along with his name, although he "was said to have been the mother’s favorite" (4). He is the first of the twins to break with their father, moving "back into the hills" of Yoknapatawpha (5). He is "a dark, silent, aquiline-faced man" whom "both neighbors and strangers let severely alone" (6).

736 Cornelia Mardis Holland

In "Smoke," Cornelia Holland is the daughter and only child of Mr. Mardis. She marries Anselm Holland (Senior). She bears him twin sons - Anselm (Junior) and Virginius - of whom the former "was said to have been the mother’s favorite" (4). Her father's property is held in her name after his death. She dies of unspecified causes when her sons are still children, though the narrator and others believe "her life had been worn out by the crass violence of [her husband,] an underbred outlander" (4).

737 Virginius Holland

In "Smoke," Virginius Holland is a son of Anselm (Senior) and twin brother of Anselm (Junior). The Holland brothers share "dark, identical, aquiline faces" (15), but have different temperaments. Virginius, as the twin who probably takes after his mother, tries to mediate between his brother and their father. No one has ever witnessed Virginius lose his temper. Nonetheless, even Virginius is forced by his father, eventually, to vacate the Mardis-Holland home. Hereafter, Virginius lives with his cousin Granby Dodge, whose mortgages he rather naively pays off.

738 Mr. Holland 1

In "Tomorrow," Mr. Holland is the foreman of the jury that cannot reach a verdict in the Bookwright murder trial; Chick recognizes him as the man arguing in exasperation with Mr. Fentry.

739 Mr. Holland 2

In The Mansion, Mr. Holland is the President of the Bank of Jefferson, the rival of the bank founded by Bayard Sartoris. Holland creates a scholarship in honor of his "only son," who died fighting in World War II (361).

740 Ina May Armstid

In "Spotted Horses" the oldest child of the Armstids is named Ina May. She is "about twelve" (178), and takes care of her younger siblings while her mother is shuttling back and forth to Mrs. Littlejohn's. According to Mrs. Armstid "Ina May bars the door" and keeps "the axe in bed with her" while her mother is away (179). When The Hamlet retells this story the Armstids' twelve-year-old daughter is not named, but she plays the same offstage role, guarding over the "littlest ones" with an axe through the nights her mother is away (347).

741 Armstid Children

The number of children born on the Armstid farm in Frenchman's Bend is either four or five. A character in "Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard" refers to them as "them chaps" (138), but at least one is a daughter: in "Spotted Horses," Ina May, the only one ever named, is twelve, and "big enough to take care of the little ones" while their mother is at Mrs. Littlejohn's nursing their father (178). Though unnamed, she plays the same role in The Hamlet. In Light in August there are five children, all born "in six years," and now "raised to man- and womanhood" (15).

742 Isham Quick

In "Tomorrow" Isham Quick is the son of proprietor of Quick's Mill. Isham is the first on the scene after Bookwright shoots and kills Buck Thorpe, and helps to reconstruct the story of Buck and Jackson Longstreet for Chick Mallison and Gavin Stevens.

743 Ben Quick's Grandchild

One of Ben Quick's grandchildren is mentioned in The Hamlet, although not identified as a boy or a girl. Ben has a son named Isham, but whether he is the father of this child is also not said.

744 Mrs. Ben Quick

Mrs. Ben Quick makes a very brief appearance in "Tomorrow" when Isham Quick refers to "the dishes and skillet [that] mammy" let Fentry have while he lived in the boiler room at the sawmill (105).

745 Solon Quick

There are several Quicks living in Frenchman's Bend - Faulkner scholars don't agree on how many. To Brooks, Solon and Lon Quick are one character. Dasher and Kirk, on the other hand, separate them into two characters, which is what we also do in our data. This entry is for Solon, who appears in three Yoknapatawpha fictions as one of the farmers in the Bend. He is a major character in the comic "Shingles for the Lord," where he and Res Grier try to out-smart each other in a dog-and-work swapping transaction.

746 Mrs. Solon Quick

In "Shall Not Perish," the wife of Solon Quick lives with him on a farm in Frenchman's Bend. She also rides to Jefferson in the bus that he drives, paying the same fare as all the other riders. The money she uses is "egg-money," that is, money she makes from selling the eggs that her chickens lay (111).

747 Theron Quick

Theron Quick, who appears in The Hamlet as one of the suitors for Eula Varner's hand, could be Lon Quick's son, who appears elsewhere in the novel and has a separate entry in our database. He is among the suitors who ambush McCarron, but ends up being beaten unconscious by Eula, who defends McCarron with her father's buggy whip. He is also one of the two Frenchman's Bend suitors who leave the area "suddenly overnight" once it is discovered that Eula is pregnant - though Ratliff believes both of these young men were "just wishing they had" (140).

748 Buck Connors II

In The Town, Buck Connors II is the son of Marshal Buck Connors and friends with Chick Mallison. Chick remembers him as one of the group of boys who dared each other during the hunting party that takes place at Harrykin Creek. (The Marshal name is elsewhere spelled 'Conner,' but here both father and son are 'Connors.')

749 Calvin Burden I

Colonel Sartoris' killing of two Northerners during Reconstruction is told four times in the fictions. The first time, in Flags in the Dust, Will Falls refers to them as "them two cyarpet-baggers" (23). They are given names in Light in August, where the same event is retold from Joanna Burden's perspective. The oldest of these men is her grandfather, Calvin Burden I; he lost one of his arms fighting against slavery as "a member of a troop of partisan guerilla horse" in 1861 (244).

750 Calvin Burden II

Colonel Sartoris' killing of two Northerners during Reconstruction is told four times in the fictions. The first time, in Flags in the Dust, Will Falls refers to them as "them two cyarpet-baggers" (23). They are given names in Light in August, where the same event is retold from Joanna Burden's perspective. The younger of these men is her half-brother, Calvin Burden II; Joanna calls him "a boy who had never even cast his first vote" (249).

751 Evangeline Burden

In Light in August Evangeline Burden is the first wife of Calvin Burden I, and the mother of their four children. She is also the daughter of a St. Louis, Missouri, family of Huguenot descent, who came west "from Carolina" - the location so many of the leading white families in Yoknapatawpha migrate from (241).

752 Nathaniel Burden

Joanna Burden's father in Light in August. He is the only son of Calvin Burden I and Evangeline. Like his father, he runs away from home as a teenager. In the far west he meets Juana, and they have a son, Calvin Burden II, born out of wedlock in 1854. With his father and son he moves to Jefferson in 1866, "to help with the freed negroes" (251).

753 Nathaniel Burrington I

In Light in August the first Nathaniel Burrington stands at the head of the ancestral line that reaches an end with Joanna Burden. He is a Unitarian minister in New England who fathers ten children, the youngest of whom is Calvin, who changes his last name from Burrington to Burden.

754 Nathaniel Burrington II

The relatives of Joanna Burden who remain in New Hampshire in Light in August are named Burrington. Her nephew Nathaniel - he has the same name as her great-grandfather - offers a $1000 reward for her killer after he is informed about her murder.

755 Beck Burden

She is one of three daughters of Calvin Burden I and Evangeline in Light in August. "Beck" is presumably short for Rebecca. Unlike their older brother Nathaniel, who is dark like their mother, all three daughters have blue eyes.

756 Vangie Burden

She is one of three daughters of Calvin Burden I and Evangeline in Light in August. "Vangie" is presumably a nickname for "Evangeline," which is her mother's name. Unlike their older brother Nathaniel, who is dark like their mother, all three daughters have blue eyes.

757 Sarah Burden

She is one of three daughters of Calvin Burden I and Evangeline in Light in August. Unlike their older brother Nathaniel, who is dark like their mother, all three daughters have blue eyes.

758 Juana Burden

Juana is the Hispanic wife of Nathaniel Burden and the mother of Calvin Burden II in Light in August. Born in Mexico, she waits a dozen years to get married and legitimize her child. In 1866 she comes to Jefferson with her husband and father-in-law. She dies not long after her son is killed by Colonel Sartoris, though in the account of her family that Joanna - who is named after her - gives Joe Christmas, she does not mention the cause of Juana's death.

759 Mrs. Nathaniel Burden

In Light in August Joanna Burden's mother is Nathaniel Burden's second wife, but compared to all Joanna tells Joe Christmas about Juana, Burden's first wife after after whom she is named, Joanna says very little about her own mother, not even her name. All we know about her is that she moves to Jefferson from New Hampshire after Nathaniel writes his cousin there that he is seeking a wife who is "a good housekeeper and . . . at least thirtyfive years old" (250).

760 Burrington, Cousin of Nathaniel Burden

In Light in August it is this cousin of Nathaniel Burden who finds a bride in New Hampshire for him. Since the other New England relatives of the Burdens are named Burrington, we presume that's also this cousin's last name.

761 Mrs. Freeman

In The Hamlet Mrs. Freeman watches as Eck and Wall Street try to catch their horse. Eck and the boy try to stop the horse by tripping it. "She said that when it hit that rope, it looked just like one of these here great big Christmas pinwheels" (365).

762 Lucy Pate Houston|Letty Bookright Houston

Like her husband, Mrs. Houston is mentioned in all three novels in the Snopes trilogy. Her story is essentially the same: within a year of their marriage, she is killed by his horse, a dangerous stallion. But her maiden name changes, from Lucy Pate (in The Hamlet) to Letty Bookright (in The Town), as does the brief biography provided in those first two volumes, and as do the details of her death. She comes into focus most vividly in The Hamlet. Her essential role in the trilogy is to be the reason why Houston is a widower.

763 Mrs. Odum Bookwright

In The Hamlet Odom Bookwright mentions but does not name his wife when he tells Ratliff that she hasn't spoken of "anybody's new sewing machine in almost a year" (76).

764 Bookwright

This "solid, well-to-do farmer, husband and father" from Frenchman's Bend is Gavin Stevens' client in "Tomorrow" (90). There is no way to determine if he is Odum or Homer or Cal, or yet a different member of the Bookwright|Bookright family. This Bookwright turned himself in after shooting Buck Thorpe to keep him from eloping with his daughter; the story begins during his trial for that crime.

765 Bookwright's Daughter

Never given a first name in "Tomorrow," this "country girl of seventeen" (90) falls for Buck Thorpe's swagger. Her father, referred to only as "Bookwright," apparently discover her during "the inevitable elopement at midnight" and shoots Buck (90). Her subsequent fate is not mentioned.

766 Captain Warren

In the 1932 short story "Death Drag" Captain Warren is a well-to-do war veteran who has established himself comfortably in his home town; adults and children alike know him as "an ex-army flyer" who "was in the war" (185, 188). There is actually no clear evidence in the story that Warren's home town is Jefferson, and its likely that if he did live in Yoknapatawpha he would have been mentioned in Flags in the Dust (1929), with its focus on aviators and returning wounded veterans.

767 Charley 2

The man named "Charley" in The Reivers (146) is described by Lucius as "a switchman, a railroad man anyway," in "greasy overalls" (141). He helps load the horse into the boxcar.

768 Tull

Among the suitors for Eula Varner listed in The Mansion are "Tulls" (130). Tulls appear in almost a dozen fictions; most of them are either Vernon Tull or identifiable as members of his immediate family. The Tull or Tulls courting Eula are unlikely to be Vernon, but presumably are somehow related to him.

769 Tull, Daughters of Vernon

The children of Frenchman's Bend farmer Vernon Tull and his wife are all girls, but there is no consensus among the fictions about how many daughters they have. In the earliest representation of the Tull family, As I Lay Dying, there are two, named Eula and Kate. In "Spotted Horses" there are three - none named. In The Hamlet, there are four, again not named; though one of these girls is referred to as the "biggest" when all four appear at the Snopes trial, they are described as a unit when they "turn their heads as one head" (357).

770 Kate Tull

In As I Lay Dying Eula is one of the two daughters of Cora and Vernon Tull. Apparently while the Tulls were in town she bought a "bead" necklace for "twenty-five cents," perhaps to appeal to Darl Bundren, whom she watches as he passes through the Bundren house (9). Either she or her sister is the daughter Whitfield refers to at Addie's funeral as "Tull's youngest" (179).

771 Eula Tull

In As I Lay Dying Kate is one of Vernon and Cora Tull's two daughters. The way she appears in her parents' narrative sections suggests that she is clear-eyed if not angry and cynical about the place that she occupies as a poor woman. She calls out the woman who changed her mind about buying her mother's cakes as one of "those rich town ladies" (7) and even gets ahead of the plot of the novel when she predicts that Anse will "get another [wife] before cotton-picking" (34). She may also be attracted to Jewel Bundren.

772 Odum Tull

Odum Tull appears only once in the fictions, in "Fool About a Horse," when he gives his neighbor Vynie Snopes and her milk separator a ride back home from Jefferson in his wagon. (When Faulkner revised this story for inclusion in The Hamlet, he is essentially replaced by a farmer named Cliff Odum.)

773 Unnamed Coroner 1

The man who is referred to simply as "the coroner" in Sanctuary man may also be the local undertaker, but all one can say for certain is that he "sits over" Tommy's body as it lays in the funeral parlor trying unsuccessfully to learn the corpse's last name (113).

774 Unnamed Coroner 4

In Intruder in the Dust the coroner who is going to perform the autopsy on Jake Montgomery's body is waiting at "the undertaker's back door" when it arrives there (177).

775 Unnamed Sheriff 9

The antebellum "sheriff of the county" who leads the "posse" that follows and then arrests Sutpen on suspicion of having committed some kind of crime (34, 35) in Absalom! is probably not Major de Spain, who is the county sheriff in the years immediately following the Civil War.

776 Unnamed Sheriff 1

The county sheriff in The Sound and the Fury is a man with "vigorous untidy iron-gray hair and his gray eyes were round and shiny like a little boy's" (301-02). He exercises his judgment - about Jason Compson in particular - when he refuses to help Jason chase after his niece on Easter Sunday. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

777 Unnamed Sheriff 3

The county sheriff who appears in Sanctuary is "a fat man, with a broad, dull face"; he arrests Lee Goodwin in the first half of the novel, and then, just before Lee is lynched, expresses his hope that the crowd outside the jail "wont do anything" (293). (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

778 Unnamed Sheriff 6

This sheriff is only mentioned in "Skirmish at Sartoris" as a story and again as a chapter in The Unvanquished. After killing the two Burdens, John Sartoris tells his followers that he plans to find the sheriff and "make bond" (208). The office of Sheriff was different from the office of Marshal that is at stake in the election. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

780 Unnamed Sheriff 5

The county sheriff who oversees the assessment and payment of property taxes on the Mardis-Holland property never appears directly in "Smoke." (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions. Obviously in some of these cases - at least when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment - Faulkner may be thinking of the same unnamed character, or one of the half dozen "Sheriff Hampton"s who also appear in the fictions, but from the texts themselves there is no way to establish that.)

781 Unnamed Sheriff 8

In "Monk," the county sheriff is mentioned by negation, as a way to characterize the hill country in the eastern part of the county from which Monk hails: according to the narrator, the area is so dangerous to outsiders that not even the sheriff will go there. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

782 Unnamed Sheriff 13

While the sheriff of Yoknapatawpha never appears in person in "Knight's Gambit," Robert Markey mentions him when he tells Gavin Stevens that "your sheriff will have to send someone" to help take Max Harriss into custody (232). Later Stevens mentions a different officer of the law when he instructs his nephew to send a message to the Memphis police that includes this phrase: "use police per request Jefferson chief if necessary” (214). While the county sheriff is a familiar character in the Yoknapatawpha fictions, there is no other mention in them of a "chief" of police.

783 Unnamed Sheriff 12

In both versions of "Go Down, Moses" - the short story and the chapter of that name in the novel Go Down, Moses - Gavin Stevens briefly considers consulting "the sheriff" for help locating Mollie Beauchamp's grandson. There are three 'sheriff's in the novel, two unnamed ones (in "The Fire and the Hearth" and "Go Down, Moses"), and Sheriff Maydew in "Pantaloon in Black." They are essentially contemporaneous, but the text does not suggest any connection between any of them - so we have created three separate "Sheriff" entries.

784 Unnamed Sheriff 10

At the end of "Hand upon the Waters" the "sheriff of the county" visits Stevens to wrap up the details of Stevens' unofficial investigation. He tries to get Stevens to confirm that Joe murdered Boyd Ballenbaugh. Stevens does not take the bait. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions.

785 Unnamed Mottstown Sheriff 2

The unnamed sheriff of the county that includes Mottstown in "That Will Be Fine" is going to question Uncle Rodney about the bond theft and forgery. He later watches for Uncle Rodney's attempt to abscond with Grandpa's neighbor's wife and "all the jewelry" (281).

786 Unnamed Sheriff 7

In "Uncle Willy" the sheriff, the county's chief law enforcement officer, locks Willy's drugstore after the clerk has stolen most of its stock and disappeared. (Unnamed county sheriffs appear in fifteen different Yoknapatawpha fictions. Obviously in some of these cases - at least when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment - Faulkner may be thinking of the same unnamed character, or one of the half dozen "Sheriff Hampton"s who also appear in the fictions, but from the texts themselves there is no way to establish that.)

787 Unnamed Mottstown Sheriff 1

After Joe Christmas' arrest in Light in August, the unnamed sheriff of the county that includes Mottstown encourages the crowd outside the jail to respect the law.

790 Addie Bundren

Although Addie Bundren only appears in As I Lay Dying, she is one of the most memorable women characters in the Yoknapatawpha fictions, and in her impact on her children both before and after her death a great example of the role 'absence' plays in Faulkner's world. A former school teacher who came to Frenchman's Bend from Jefferson, Addie is the matriarch of the Bundren family who is lying on her death bed when the narrative begins. Her spiteful wish to be buried in Jefferson initiates and drives the journey at the center of the novel.

791 Anse Bundren

Anse Bundren is a farmer by vocation, but he is perhaps more accurately described with a term Faulkner's fiction regularly applies to the Snopeses: parasite. Unlike Flem, however, Anse is rendered comically rather than as a threat to the social order. He is described as a "kind of tall, gaunted man" (203). Physically his most striking feature seems to be his hair; Peabody calls it "pushed and matted up . . . like a dipped rooster" (44).

792 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 12

In "Uncle Willy" the man who takes Darl Bundren in handcuffs to the mental hospital is described as "a fat deputy sheriff that was smoking a cigar" (228); he did not appear in Faulkner's original account of this event, at the end of the novel As I Lay Dying (1930). (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

794 Unnamed Murdered Deputy

Chapter 31 of Sanctuary begins with Popeye being arrested (wrongly) "for the murder of a policeman in a small Alabama town" (302). Later, after he has been (wrongly) convicted for the crime, the novel provides one detail about the victim: according to Popeye's jailer, "folks here says that deppity invited killing" for the "two-three mean things folks knows about" (313).

795 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 5

This is one of the two deputies mentioned in "Monk." This one is the officer who arrests Monk in the gas station. He may or may not be the same one who later transports him to the state penitentiary by train. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

796 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 6

This is one of the two deputies mentioned in "Monk." This deputy transports Monk to the state penitentiary by train. He may or may not be the same deputy who earlier arrested Monk. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

797 Unnamed Wife of Deputy Sheriff

In "Pantaloon in Black" and again in Go Down, Moses, the wife of the deputy who narrates much of the last section of the story is described as "a stout woman, handsome once, graying now and with a neck definitely too short, who looked not harried at all but choleric" (252, 147). She is impatient with her husband, and preoccupied with her own concerns; her rapid movements between kitchen and dining room suggest her lack of interest in her husband's account of a black man's lynching.

798 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 1

This deputy sheriff escorts Lee Goodwin on his trips between the jail and the courthouse in Sanctuary. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

799 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 13

This is the first of the two deputy sheriffs who appear in The Mansion; he escorts Mink to Parchman Penitentiary. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

800 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 14

This is the second of the two deputy sheriffs The Mansion; he is only mentioned, as transporting a prisoner from Greenville.

801 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 2

In "The Hound" there is a character referred to as "the second deputy" in the group of officers who arrest Mink Snopes (162). He rides in the front seat of the sheriff's "battered Ford" car with "the driver," a man named Joe (163). (Joe is presumably the story's 'first' deputy.)

802 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 8

In "Tomorrow," Quick identifies this unnamed man as "the deputy or bailiff or whatever he was" (105). He accompanies the Thorpe brothers when they arrive in Frenchman's Bend with a court order for custody of their sister's child. (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment.

803 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 9

In "Error in Chemistry," this unnamed deputy accompanies the sheriff to investigate the initial call from Joel Flint about his wife's death. He may or may not be the same as one of the named deputies in the story.

804 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 10

In Intruder in the Dust this "deputy" drives the car in which Sheriff Hampton brings Lucas Beauchamp to jail (42). (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

805 Unnamed Deputy Sheriff 11

In The Town this deputy brings a suitcase to Montgomery Ward Snopes' studio, so Sheriff Hampton can lock up Snopes' "album" (174) of ""French postcards" (171). (As is also the case with county sheriffs, there are many unnamed deputy sheriffs in the Yoknapatawpha fictions. It's possible that Faulkner is imagining at least some of these deputies as recurring, especially when the stories are set at more or less the same historical moment. However, there is no way to be sure of that, so it is more accurate to represent each of these deputies as a separate character.)

806 Unnamed Doctor 11

This is the doctor whom Lucas Beauchamp goes to get when Zack Edmonds’s wife has trouble in labor in Go Down, Moses; he arrives too late to prevent her death. (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

807 Doctor Crawford

The doctor who works at Hoke's sawmill appears anonymously in "Lion" and by name, as Doctor Crawford, in Go Down, Moses. He's not a veterinarian, but when in the short story Boon shows up "just before daylight," and "drags him out of bed like a sack of meal," he goes to the hunting camp and works on the wounded Lion (196). In "Lion" he also treats Boon, and in the novel treats both Boon and Sam.

808 Unnamed Doctor 5

"The doctor" - a phrase which suggests the town has only one doctor - appears three times in "Miss Zilphia Gant": twice to treat Zilphia, and once to treat her mother (372, 375, 380). On his first visit he tells Mrs. Gant that Zilphia "would have to have companionship, to play with children of her own age and out-of-doors" (372). (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

809 Unnamed Doctor 7

There are over a dozen Jefferson physicians in the fictions, but the doctor in the story "Uncle Willy" is invented by Willy as a way to get his rich sister in Texas to buy him a car. According to Willy's letter to her, this doctor prescribes a car as a way to save Willy from having "to walk back and forth to the store" in his fragile health (235). According to the narrator, Willy wants the car in order to get to the moonshine stills in the hills outside Jefferson and to the brothels in Memphis.

810 Unnamed Doctor 8

"The doctor" in Absalom! treats Charles E. S-V. Bon after the fight at "the negro ball" (164). (In the various fictions there are three named Jefferson doctors who appear more than once - Habersham in the early life of the town; Peabody and Alford in the 20th century - but there are also over a dozen doctors who are never named.

811 Unnamed Doctor 10

This is the doctor in The Hamlet who inspects Mink Snopes after his suicide attempt. (This very minor character is probably also the same "doctor" as the one who examines Cotton in the story "The Hound," but since Faulkner has changed 'Cotton' to 'Mink' when he revised that story for inclusion in the novel, it seems appropriate to enter this doctor as a different character too.)

812 Unnamed Doctor 12

In The Reivers the country doctor whom Lucius sees in Parsham is "an iron-gray man" at least sixty years old (185). His white shirt and black coat are both unclean, and he "smells like something [that] isn't just alcohol" (185). According to Butch, it's ether. Doctors used ether as an anesthetic, but it was also ab-used as an addictive drug. For all his shortcomings, the narrative treats this doctor - and his 35-year-old memory of a visit to a Memphis brothel - kindly.

813 Unnamed Doctors

Along with the similarly vague group of "ministers" (123), this group of "the doctors" in town visit Emily Grierson's house to persuade her to relinquish her father's corpse (124).

814 Unnamed Doctor 2

The first of the two unnamed doctors who appear in Sanctuary is the Jefferson physician who attends Ruby's child; after her child has a bad night in the hotel, Ruby tells Horace that "I finally got the doctor" (135). The doctor who appears in all three previous Yoknapatawpha novels is named Peabody, described as the fattest man in Yoknapatawpha County, but this doctor is someone else, "a young man with a small black bag" whom Horace obviously has never seen before (135).

815 Unnamed Doctor 3

The second of the two unnamed doctors in Sanctuary is the Florida doctor whom Popeye's mother consults about her sickly child; he tells her to "feed him eggs cooked in olive oil" (305). (It is possible that Faulkner is making a strange and subversive reference to the cartoon characters Popeye and Olive Oyl; both these E. C. Segar characters had appeared in newspapers at least two years before Sanctuary was published.)

816 Unnamed Doctor 9

In "Hand upon Waters" the insurance company doctor who examines Lonnie Grinnup in Mottstown "had never seen Lonnie Grinnup before, but he had known Tyler Ballenbaugh for years," and so has no qualms about qualifying Lonnie for the policy that Tyler pays for (77).

817 Doctor Peabody 2

In "A Name for the City" and again in Requiem for a Nun "Doctor Peabody" is one of the "new faces" that arrive in Yoknapatawpha after the first group of pioneers and becomes "old Doctor Habersham's successor" as the community's physician (206). He is presumably an ancestor of the Doctor Peabody who in other fictions takes care of Yoknapatawpha's sick and wounded until well into the twentieth century, but neither text ever specifies the relationship between the two men. This earlier Peabody provides laudanum to add to the whiskey given to the militia for their celebration.

818 Grier Ancestors

The Grier family appears in three stories from the early 1940s, but only the last of them - "Shall Not Perish" (1943) - mentions first generations of Griers in Yoknapatawpha. They first farmed the land that seems to have been passed from one generation to the next.

819 Marsh

Maw Grier's brother Marsh fought and was wounded in World War I. For Mrs. Grier in "Two Soldiers," her brother's decision to enlist in 1917 gives her a way to appreciate why in 1941 her oldest son Pete has "got to go" to the another war. For Mr. Grier, however, Marsh's "actual wound on the battlefields of France" means the family has already contributed "enough" to U.S. war efforts (85). Mrs. Grier mentions her brother again in "Shall Not Perish."

820 Unnamed Grandfather of Mrs. Grier

Mrs. Grier mentions this character in "Shall Not Perish" when she is consoling Major de Spain for the loss of his son: "my grandfather was in that old one there too" (109), meaning the Civil War.

821 Unnamed Great-Grandmother of Mrs. Grier

In "Shall Not Perish," when Mrs. Grier consoles Major de Spain for the loss of his son in the early days of World War Two, she mentions her own grandfather who fought in the Civil War, adding that "I reckon his mother didn't know why [he had to enlist] either, but I reckon he did" (109).

822 Grier, Grandfather of Res

The man the narrator of "Shall Not Perish" calls "Grandpap" is actually his father's grandfather. Sounding like the boy he is, the narrator says he is "old, so old you just wouldn't believe it" (111). In his dotage all he talks about is "the Confederate war," though the narrative does not say how he was involved in the Civil War (112). (The narrator's mother's grandfather also served in the Civil War, but his last name wouldn't have been Grier.)

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