Unnamed Women Married by J.P.s

In the middle of describing Sutpen and Ellen's wedding in Absalom, Absalom! Mr. Compson interrupts his reconstruction to generalize about women who never had formal weddings: "women who were married by tobacco-chewing j[ustices of the] p[eace]s in country courthouses or by ministers waked after midnight" (37). According to his misogynistic assertion, it is the longing of these women for a more ceremonial wedding that is the cause of "most divorces" (37).

Absalom, Absalom!, 301 (Event)

301

Absalom, Absalom!, 301 (Event)

301

Absalom, Absalom!, 301 (Event)

301

Absalom, Absalom!, 299 (Event)

299

Absalom, Absalom!, 276 (Event)

276

Absalom, Absalom!, 203 (Event)

203

Unnamed Slave Buyers

When Mr. Compson describes how Charles Bon initiates Henry Sutpen into the secrets of white male upper class life in New Orleans by taking him to the place where white-featured enslaved women are sold to men who will use them for sex, he describes the "young men" whom Henry sees with a series of adjectives: "elegant," "trim," "predatory" and "(at the moment) goatlike" (89).

Unnamed Slave Buyers

When Mr. Compson describes how Charles Bon initiates Henry Sutpen into the secrets of white male upper class life in New Orleans by taking him to the place where white-featured enslaved women are sold to men who will use them for sex, he describes the "young men" whom Henry sees with a series of adjectives: "elegant," "trim," "predatory" and "(at the moment) goatlike" (89). Bon - or at least, Mr. Compson's version of Bon - later refers to this group as "the thousand, the white men" who "made, created and produced" the white-featured female slaves whom they purchase (91).

Absalom, Absalom!, 88 (Event)

88

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