Digital Yoknapatawpha Project: Entering Keywords

Here are the Drupal tips, the specific formatting rules, and the larger policies we've shared and agreed on for entering keywords. As I wrote this all out it seemed very abstract, but as I'm sure you recall from our meeting, once you start actually entering the terms the process becomes almost intuitive. On the other hand, never hesitate to ask the group if you have a question about something. We are all in this together!

To begin, open Drupal in multiple browser windows - at least these 5:
Events for your text; Characters for your text; Locations for your text; the 2 new Drupal tabs - Keywords and KW Table.
You'll also, of course, need the Vintage International edition of the text you're keywording, so page numbers will align.

Define the beginning and end points of each event:
There are several ways to do this; simplest is probably using a 6th browser window, the DY Events SEARCH page:
"http://faulkner.iath.virginia.edu/events.html" - select your text, don't select anything else, and hit SEARCH; this will return all the Events in both page and event order with page #s and first words of each Event.

Read through Event to decide what elements in it you want to keyword.
As you are doing that, you should check out the "Keywords" box at the bottom of the Event page, to see what the text's original editors listed as keywords; many of these earlier keywords are inappropriate, but others are still usable, and just seeing what the first team culled out can be very helpful.

Once you identify Term 2 and Term3 keywords you want to use, you can get help finding right Term1 (Environment, for ex) and Term2 (Weather) you want to enter them under by

1) consulting the alphabetical Term 2 index I sent you (I'll include it again at end of these instructions).
2) using Keyword page Raf created - http://faulkner.drupal.shanti.virginia.edu/keywords
    on this page italics means the term is a Term2; CTRL-F will search whole list.
3) using the other page Raf created for us, KW Table - http://faulkner.drupal.shanti.virginia.edu/keywords2
    on this page "Vocabulary" allows you to specify Term1, "Parent=(first level term)" means the term is a Term2.

As a rule, we will usually add a Term3 to further qualify the Term2 we selected.
We agreed on several rules for choosing/creating Term3s --

1. It's important not to duplicate terms, and also desirable to collect similar ideas under same umbrella term.
Once you choose a Term1 on Event page, pulldown menu will show you a list of the Term2s; once you select a Term2 from that list, Drupal will show you a list of all the Term3s that have been created under that term. Always look over this list first, to see if you can use one that's already on it to capture what you want to keyword.
SPECIAL NOTE for Allusions: before entering a person or place name (Stonewall Jackson, say, or Honolulu, Hawaii) check Character and/or Location lists for your text to make sure that person or place hasn't already been created as a Character or Location.

2. If you don't find anything appropriate on list, use <create new> to create term you want, following these guidelines:
It's important that we all use same stylistic conventions for creating Term3s, so
Capitalize one word Term3s (Horse, Rain, Joy, etc);

For phrases, Capitalize first word in phrase, but not other words - Hunting camp, Trying to say, etc.
Also for Term3s of more than one word:
Use , in proper names of people and places - Washington, George   or   Paris, France
Use - in 2-word Relationships - Father-son, Mentor-disciple, etc.
SPECIAL NOTE for Relationships: we agreed to always list older or more dominant individual first - Mother-son, Employer-employee, etc.

After you select Term2 and select-or-create Term3, don't forget to hit ADD button. <create new> does not save the term with the Event. It's a good idea to look over all 6 of the main fields (Environment to Aesthetics) to see if there are still words or phrases in the Term3 box (which means you didn't ADD them to Event) before you hit Save to move to next Event.
After ADDing all your keywords for the Event, don't forget to SAVE it before moving on to next Event.

OTHER POLICIES

1. It's very important that we all are using any given Term3 to mean the same thing.
So we agreed that whenever we create a new Term3, and there's a chance that the meaning we have in mind will not be self-evident and unambiguous to other collaborators, we owe the group a Note in which we briefly explain that meaning. Here's how we agreed to do that:
As soon as you ADD the term, go to page under the Keywords tab, use CRTL+F to find your new term (Under Term1 and Term2 where you created it), click Edit button, and in the box that will appear write out a brief explanation of what you are using it to do -

Example: Term1: Themes and Motifs; Term2: Arrivals/Departures; NEW Term3: Advent

After I ADD it on Event page, in another browser window I find "Advent" on Keyword page, click on "edit" and type following annotation in the Description box:
    For the first time a significant character appears at a place, like Flem's first arrival in Frenchman's Bend, or Sutpen's in Jefferson. SR

Add your initials at the end of the note so when these are turned into annotations in our forthcoming glossary you can get credit - and/or when a fellow collaborator has a question she/he can contact you.

2. What to keyword? Not everything that is mentioned or implied in an Event can or should be keyworded. Start with the elements in the passage that seem most salient, notable, likely to be of interest to readers of Faulkner and users of DY. For example, most talking need not be entered as Actions|Verbal|Talking, but if the dialogue calls attention to itself as dialogue, that's "keywordable." If a line of dialogue sounds angry, I don't think I'd keyword it, but if the passage itself describes the anger or rage of a Character, I'd keyword Actions|Emotional|Anger, etc. As you're deciding what to keyword, use the 6 main categories (Environment - Aesthetics) as a way to make sure you consider the content of the Event from all those angles, but if only 1 or 2 of those categories seem to point to something that rises to "keyword significance," that's fine. Based on our collective experience, most Events will probably have 4-6 keywords, but many will only have 1 and some might have many more than 6.

3. Try to think outside as well as inside your own interpretive interests. Over time, however, every Event in every text will be parsed by more than one collaborator, so we will have each other's back.

4. We agreed to allow a range of what we could call levels of thoroughness as to what gets keyworded.

We agreed, for example, that every time an Animal makes its first appearance in a text, it gets a Themes&Motives|Animals|keyword. If a deer appears on page 112 and another deer on page 121, then each one gets the T&M|Animals|Deer keyword.
But we also agreed that we do not have to keyword either of these deer every subsequent time it appears - although collaborators who want to be that thorough certainly can. Similarly, if Characters are Actions|Movement|Wagon in recurring Events (think Bundrens, for ex), then the Event in which that wagon first starts moving gets keyworded, but if that wagon keeps rolling through consecutive Events, it is not necessary to enter Movement|Wagon each time. (I would do a new Actions|Movement|Wagon, however, whenever the Bundrens start moving again on a new day's journey.)
BUT if there's an Event in the sequence in which the dog whom you've already keyworded or the wagon that's already moving is given a new emphasis or described in a significant way in the text, you should enter it again, to capture that kind of new narrative significance or attention.

5. Use "passim" in a text's first Event for something that is pervasive across all the Events (Aesthetics|Narrative|First-person vernacular passim, or Aesthetics|Tone|Comic passim). If story is comic almost invariably, but has a serious moment, say, at its 23rd Event, we should still use passim, but use Aesthetics|Tone|Serious or something like that to note when new tone appears - and restart Tone|Comic passim after it ends.
But we also agreed that anyone who wants to keyword Tone|Comic for all the Events in a text individually can do so. It's allowable, but it's not necessary.


INDEX OF Term2s:

This is meant to help you locate the bigger box (Term1) inside which each Term2 appears. I.e. if I can't remember whether Clothes is a CULTURAL ISSUE or a THEME AND MOTIF, I can look Clothes up below (use Ctrl+F to search down list).


Absence/Loss (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Age (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Agricultural (ACTIONS)
Agriculture (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Alcohol (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Allusion, Biblical (AESTHETICS)
Allusion, Geographical (AESTHETICS)
Allusion, Historical (AESTHETICS)
Allusion, Literary (AESTHETICS)
Allusion, Mythical (AESTHETICS)
Ambiguity (AESTHETICS)
Ancestral (RELATIONSHIPS)
Animals (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Appearance (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Arrivals/Departures (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Art (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Atmospheric (ENVIRONMENT)
Auditory (ENVIRONMENT)

Bodily (ACTIONS)
Body (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Chaos/Order (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Character (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Civic (RELATIONSHIPS)
Commercial (RELATIONSHIPS)
Communication (ACTIONS)
Community (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Class (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Clothes (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Composing (ACTIONS)
Crime (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Cultural Identity (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Death (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Description (AESTHETICS)
Determinism (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Diction (AESTHETICS)
Domestic Space (ENVIRONMENT)
Domestic (ACTIONS)

Economic (ACTIONS)
Economical (RELATIONSHIPS)
Economy (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Education (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Emotional (ACTIONS)
Entertainment (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Ethnicity (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Exile (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Familial (RELATIONSHIPS)
Food (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Friendship (RELATIONSHIPS)
Futility (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Gender (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Global (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Government (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Group Mentality (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Health and Illness (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Hierarchical (RELATIONSHIPS)
History (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Home (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Hunting (ACTIONS)

Identity, Cultural (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Identity, Personal (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Inheritance (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Institutional (RELATIONSHIPS)
Interaction, Private (ACTIONS)
Interaction, Social (ACTIONS)
Intergenerational (RELATIONSHIPS)
Interpretation (AESTHETICS)
Interracial (RELATIONSHIPS)
Interspecies (RELATIONSHIPS)
Intertextuality (AESTHETICS)
Labor (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Land-Use (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Language (AESTHETICS)
Law (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Legal (ACTIONS)
Marital (RELATIONSHIPS)
Mass Media (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Materialism (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Meaning (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Media (AESTHETICS)
Memory (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Mental (ACTIONS)
Metafictions (AESTHETICS)
Migration (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Military (ACTIONS)
Modernity (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Money (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Morals (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Movement (ACTIONS)

Naming (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Narrative (AESTHETICS)
Nationality (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Natural (ENVIRONMENT)
Non-Human (ACTIONS)
Objects (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Olfactory (ENVIRONMENTS)
Otherworldly (ENVIRONMENTS)
Past (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Perceptual (ACTIONS)
Philosophical (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Physical (ACTIONS)
Place (ENVIRONMENT)
Play (ACTIONS)
Politics (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Prejudice (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Progress (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Psychological (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Public (ENVIRONMENT)

Race (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Recurring Episodes (AESTHETICS)
Recurring Tropes (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Region (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Religion (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Ritual (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Romantic (RELATIONSHIPS)
Segregation (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Sexual (RELATIONSHIPS)
Sexuality (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Slavery (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Social (RELATIONSHIPS)
Story-Telling (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Style (AESTHETICS)
Supernatural (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Symbolism (AESTHETICS)
Technology (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Texts (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Time (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Time of Day (ENVIRONMENT)
Time of Year (ENVIRONMENT)
Tone (AESTHETICS)
Typography/Orthography (AESTHETICS)

Values (THEMES AND MOTIFS)
Verbal (ACTIONS)
Violence (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Violent (ACTIONS)
War (CULTURAL ISSUES)
Weather (ENVIRONMENT)
Work (ACTIONS)
Writing (THEMES AND MOTIFS)