The Boy|The Story-Teller

Display Name: 
The Boy|The Story-Teller
Sort Name: 
Unnamed Boy|Story-Teller
Race: 
White
Gender: 
Male
Class: 
Poor White
Rank: 
Major
Vitality: 
Alive
Narrator: 
First Person
Biography: 

One of many of Faulkner's "boy" narrators, this twelve-year-old son of tenant farmers is more likely an adult when he tells this story about how Pat Stamper bested both his "Pap" and "Mammy." Although he is a sympathetic companion to his father, he is also a careful reporter and analyst of Pap's behavior. At least from his older perspective, he can see Pap's weaknesses for horse- and mule-trading, and for alcohol as well. He tells this story in eloquent dialect, though his repeated use of the racial shibboleth to describe Jim reflects his own lower class white prejudices.

Note: 
An earlier version of "Fool About a Horse" has the boy "Quentin" re-telling V. K. Surratt's story to his Grandfather and Doc Peabody. (Uncollected Stories, 684-85). Faulkner further revised the story when he had V. K. Ratliff retell it in <em>The Hamlet<em>, to explain how Ab Snopes has become "plumb curdled" after his disastrous journery to and from Jefferson.
Individual or Group: 
Individual
11222

Character